Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Google decision - good for gangstas, but not in New Zealand


INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY | 20 MAY 2014

Google decision - good for gangstas, but not in New Zealand

A decision by the European Court of Justice, which allows people to request that internet information is pulled if historic or no longer relevant, has been seized upon by European criminals to have Google remove links to their criminal records.

The judgment is interesting but is unlikely to bear on the legal position in New Zealand.

The case

Google Spain SL Google Inc. v Agencia Española de Protección de Datos (AEPD) Mario Costeja González was brought by a Spanish national who complained to Google Spain and Google Inc. about personal information dating back 16 years which was available through the Google search engine.

The Court found that Google had a responsibility to erase on request links and information incompatible with EU Directive 95/46/EC protecting an individual's right to privacy.

This finding changes the legal landscape in Europe, and in the week following last Tuesday's ruling Google received a number of requests to take down information.

Worth watching

New Zealand's Privacy Act does not currently recognise "data processors", as the EU directive does. But it is worth watching developments in Europe because changes in the law or in legal interpretation there may eventually influence thinking here.

In the meantime, the Harmful Digital Communications Bill is expected to create an agency to advocate for New Zealand individuals wishing to remove digital content hosted by search engine and social media providers in cyberbullying situations. The Bill is due to be reported back from the Justice and Electoral Committee on 3 June.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: