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GIMBLETT GRAVELS wines win International Wine Challenge 2014

20 May 2014

GIMBLETT GRAVELS® wines declared NZ’s Best Red and White Wines at the International Wine Challenge 2014

Two GIMBLETT GRAVELS® wines have taken top honours at the International Wine Challenge (IWC) in London, demonstrating the remarkable quality of both red and white varieties from the District.

Crossroads Winemakers Collection Syrah 2012 was awarded “Best New Zealand Red Wine” and “Best New Zealand Syrah”, while Pask Declaration Chardonnay 2012 received trophies for the top Hawke’s Bay Chardonnay, the top New Zealand Chardonnay and the top New Zealand White Wine over all categories following on from its Gold Medal win.

The IWC is now in its 31st year and is accepted as the world's finest and most meticulously judged wine competition. Throughout the rigorous judging processes, each medal-winning wine is tasted on three separate occasions by at least ten different judges.

Crossroads Winemaker Miles Dinneen said, “It is great to receive this recognition for our Syrah at such a prestigious competition. Our Elms vineyard in the GIMBLETT GRAVELS WINEGROWING DISTRICT® consistently produces gold medal and trophy wines and this is the biggest one yet.”

The Declaration Chardonnay releases have consistently received Gold Medal awards since first being introduced in 1991.

Pask Managing Director and Winemaker Kate Radburnd said, “The award was a recognition of the development of Chardonnay in New Zealand”.

Chairman of the Gimblett Gravels Winegrowers Association (GGWA) Tony Bish was justifiably proud, saying, “For GIMBLETT GRAVELS® wines to win Best New Zealand Red Wine and Best New Zealand White Wine is an outstanding achievement. Quality will reach even greater heights with increased vine age and experience at obtaining the best expression of the terroir.”

The GIMBLETT GRAVELS WINEGROWING DISTRICT® is home to around 30 vineyards, is just 800 hectares (less than 2000 acres) and stretches along New Zealand’s State Highway 50 west of the city of Hastings in Hawke’s Bay.

Once dismissed as useless land by sheep farmers, in the 1980s a small group of pioneering wine entrepreneurs recognised the potential of the free-draining gravel soils and warm climate locale for top quality wines.

In just over quarter of a century this tiny district has developed as a world-beater, renowned for its Bordeaux varietals such as Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon as well as the sky-rocketing popularity of its intense Syrah wines.

ENDS

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