Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Agrecovery backs compulsory product stewardship

Agrecovery backs compulsory product stewardship

Nationwide rural recycling scheme Agrecovery has welcomed government moves to encourage recycling and recovery of agrichemicals and plastic containers.

A discussion document released today by Environment Minister Amy Adams is a big step towards improving the management of waste agrichemicals and their packaging.

Agrecovery Chair, Graeme Peters says “This process, when completed, will hopefully make it compulsory for companies which make and sell registered agrichemicals to be part of a product stewardship scheme.”

This would be supported by Agrecovery and the 60 companies which have supported it over the last seven years of operation, during which Agrecovery has recycled 650 tonnes of plastic and helped dispose of 30 tonnes of unwanted or expired agrichemicals.

Compulsion will remove free riders – those manufacturers who refuse to take responsibility for their waste and let others solve the problem.

“If done right, compulsion will level the playing field which currently favours companies which do not contribute a recycling levy of 12 cents per litre, and thumb their noses at product stewardship” says Mr Peters.

Manufacturers who belong to the scheme pay a levy on products to cover the cost of disposing them in an environmentally-friendly way. They make less profit to cover the levy than competitors who don’t participate in a scheme.

Agrecovery, a Ministry for the Environment accredited product stewardship scheme, supports the intent of the discussion paper but it would make the point that any government-mandated scheme must not create an expensive bureaucracy.

“Product stewardship means asking manufacturers of agrichemicals and bulk animal health products to invest a significant amount of money to fund the costs of recovery. These have to be reasonable,” says Mr Peters.

Another important point is that there must be real incentives for farmers and growers to recycle. “There is no point setting up a recycling scheme if farmers and growers don’t use it, so a big part of the solution is finding incentives for farmers and growers to participate” he said.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Internet: NZ Govt Lifts Target Speeds For Rural Broadband

The government has lifted its expectations on faster broadband speeds for rural New Zealand as it targets increased spending on research and development in the country's information and communications technology sector, which it sees as a key driver for export growth. More>>


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news