Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


NZ consumer confidence falls as interest rate hikes bite

NZ consumer confidence falls as interest rate hikes bite

By Suze Metherell

May. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand consumer confidence fell to a seven-month low in May as two interest rate hikes and expectations for slower economic growth later this year sapped people's optimism.

The ANZ-Roy Morgan consumer confidence index eased to 127.6 this month, from 133.5 in April, and is 8 points off the pre-recession high. The current conditions index slipped to 123 from 130.3 and the future conditions index fell to 130.7 from 135.8.

"Higher interest rates are starting to bite," said ANZ Bank New Zealand chief economist Cameron Bargie."The latest dent in confidence has translated into a slowing in expected economic growth over the second half of 2014.

"This is hardly ringing alarm bells - it's akin to moving from a gallop to a fast canter."

Government data last week showed retail sales grew at a slower-than-expected pace in the first quarter of this year in the lead-up to Reserve Bank kicking off a cycle of interest rate hikes in March and as the housing market slowed in response to restrictions on bank lending with small deposits. The Reserve Bank has signalled more interest rate hikes are to come and expects they will have a quicker impact with more borrowers on floating rates or fixed rates of one year or less.

The May survey of 1,047 people showed a net 10 percent of respondents were better off than a year ago, down from 13 percent in last month's survey. Looking out a year, a net 36 percent felt they would be better off, down from 40 percent the previous month. Perceptions of the broader economy fell for the fifth consecutive month, with a net 27 percent seeing better economic conditions ahead in the next 12 months down from 33 percent in April.

The biggest drop off in confidence was in those deeming it a good time to make a major household purchase, falling to a net 36 percent from last month's 47 percent.

Those thinking house prices would rise in the next two years remained static at 72 percent, predicting annual increases of 3.8 percent to 3.9 percent. Some 71 percent of respondents expect prices in general rise over the next two years at an annual pace of 3.1 percent, slower than the 3.2 percent pace seen in April.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news