Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Book Crosses Cultural Boundaries

Book Crosses Cultural Boundaries

It is possibly the most exotic winner of a Pride In Print prize ever -- a book about Brazilian native Indians partly written in Te Reo Maori.

Texts from Brazil was awarded the best of the best in the Publication Category for Wellington’s Pivotal + Thames based on its outstanding printing, finishing and overall look.

The book was written by the Brazilian Ambassador to New Zealand, Eduardo Gradilone. He had an interest in Maori culture which he progressed when arriving here by taking lessons in the language.

When it came to writing the book about Indian culture in his own country, Mr Gradilone decided to use a bilingual approach, setting the text in both English and Maori.

Translator Ratu Tibble had to do comprehensive research as many of the words did not exist in Maori.

Judge Dickon Lentell said the judging panels had described the book as beautiful.

“You can’t fault it. It has good-looking binding and the background printing is fantastic. “The book was printed with a tint consistent throughout which is very hard to achieve.

“This was an ambitious project and a large task but they have carried it off and created a most impressive piece of work.”

With his customer also having expressed delight at the result produced, Pivotal + Thames managing director Phil Jones said he was ecstatic to have the job so highly acknowledged at Pride In Print.

“I tell you what though, if we hadn’t done so well on this, I would have given up printing -- we put a lot of hard work into this job and for the client,” he said.

“We were an offset printing business and we bought Pivotal, which was an Indigo digital printing business, and we combined. When this job was presented to us, we thought we’d print it on the Komori offset machine but decided to go with the Indigo and we produced a far superior result. Then we printed the covers on the offset press and did all of the PUR binding ourselves in-house.

“We have won Gold Medals, but this is our first time as a Supreme Finalists.

“Tonight has been amazing -- it is well organised, the sponsors, the whole thing has been great and you can’t get any better than this. That gives you a lot of hope for the printing trade.”


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Health: New Zealand's First ‘No Sugary Drinks’ Logo Unveiled

New Zealand’s first “no sugary drinks logo” has been unveiled at an event in Wellington... It will empower communities around New Zealand to lift their health and wellbeing and send a clear message about the damage caused by too much sugar in our diets. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news