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Startup Removing the Paper And Excel Pain for Sports Coaches

Startup Removing the Paper And Excel Pain for Sports Coaches

Media release: May 28, 2014

Close to twenty million sports coaching sessions happen worldwide every hour, a number CoachSeek is looking to increase by easing the time intensive administrative aspects plaguing today’s coaches.

Through an easy-to-use online dashboard, CoachSeek helps coaches manage their entire coaching programme, their bookings and invoices, in a single place. Founded by 15-year tennis director and coach Ian Bishop, CoachSeek understands the need for smarter client and business management.

From interviews with hundreds of coaches worldwide, CoachSeek found that 80% of coaches use Excel and paper to plan and manage clients, calendars and athlete progress. This system is difficult to maintain and doesn’t serve today’s shift toward data-driven coaches and athletes.

CoachSeek removes the administrative headache typically associated with professional coaching and allows you to connect with your athletes on a new level.

“Some of the best coaches spend 25% of their time off the field due to administrative tasks,” says Bishop. “If we can simplify that side of the business and offer new ways of communicating with athletes, coaches can spend more time doing what they love and getting results.”

Launched in May 2014 during participation in digital startup accelerator Lightning Lab, CoachSeek already has 400 users in 34 countries across 12 sports.

CoachSeek is gaining traction and recognition quickly, with official endorsements from Golf New Zealand, and commercial structures in place with the likes of SportPlan.net, who have a user base of 500,000 coaches worldwide.

The next phase for CoachSeek is to continue their mission of getting more sports coaches into the online world and off paper and Excel. They are building further relationships with national sporting bodies worldwide and creating more partnerships with sports technology companies.

“It’s an exciting time for sports coaching,” says Bishop. “If CoachSeek is underpinning a coaches business, it positions us perfectly to explore other trends in the coaching industry. We want to help coaches have a better business, but be a better coach as well.”


http://coachseek.co.nz/


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