Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Rabobank recruits new animal proteins analyst

Rabobank recruits new animal proteins analyst

Rabobank welcomes new-comer Angus Gidley-Baird, appointed as a senior animal proteins analyst to cover the sheep and beef sectors, joining the bank’s Australia & New Zealand Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory division.

General manager of Rabobank’s Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory Luke
Chandler said Angus’ appointment brought to the team a great depth of agricultural knowledge, as well as mainstream political and economic policy awareness.

“Angus’ entire career has been spent in agribusiness and throughout this time, he has gained a very strong foundation in the sorts of issues impacting farmers and industry stakeholders all the way through the supply chain,” Mr Chandler said.

“We are very fortunate to have someone of Angus’ calibre joining our research team. His qualifications and industry expertise will be a extremely valuable to our clients and the business overall.

“The animal proteins sector is an industry with a very exciting future given the increasing emerging market demand and the uplift of exports to key regions. Angus will be working with our global team of analysts to bring this world wide expertise to Rabobank’s local Australian and New Zealand clients.”

Rabobank’s Food & Agribusiness Research and Advisory (FAR) team is charged with
analysing developments in the food and agricultural markets and industries, and
advising the bank and its clients on strategic implications for their businesses.

Comprised of a network of some 80 analysts spread across ever major production and consumption region of the world, FAR is a central component of Rabobank’s capacity for informed credit decision making, product development, advisory services and strategic client partnerships.

Mr Gidley-Baird formerly held roles at NSW Farmers Association, including policy director for Economics and Livestock, giving him a wide exposure to Australian farming operations and issues impacting rural industries. He holds an honours degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Sydney, with majors in Agricultural Economics and Marketing, as well as a masters in Accounting from Curtin University in Western Australia.

Mr Gidley-Baird said he is passionate and positive when it comes to the agricultural sector and joining Rabobank is a “great personal and professional fit”.

“Our family has always had an interest in farming – the people and the culture of the industry are real, which is part what has always attracted me to forge a career in this sector,” he said.

“Rabobank has a unique culture and ethos with its strong history of rural banking. It operates locally right across the globe, covering many facets of agriculture in many parts of the world. The interconnectivity of Rabobank’s agri knowledge gives the bank a special point of difference.”

Joining the bank with a strong rural network, Mr Gidley-Baird said he is looking forward to the opportunities to get ‘out and about’ meeting with clients and others in the Rabobank New Zealand and Australian business.

“Having that ongoing contact with farmers and engaging them with important research pertinent to their sector is going to be really interesting,” he said.

“There is a lot happening in the New Zealand and Australian sheep and beef sectors at present – I think there are some big opportunities but also challenges. It’s certainly not a time to be resting on our laurels but rather, as an industry, it’s a time to collaborate and work on fulfilling our production and export potential to supply quality products into key regions demanding our produce.”

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news