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At-Home Espresso Machines Trump Café Coffee

At-Home Espresso Machines Trump Café Coffee

¾ of coffee machine owners save money on café coffees

Auckland, 2 June 2014 – A new, nationwide survey of espresso machine owners, by Canstar Blue reveals that 60% of people prefer the coffee they make at home to that bought in a café.

Having their own coffee machine has saved owners money on café coffees, says Derek Bonnar, Canstar General Manager, New Zealand.

“More than three quarters of respondents reported that they had saved money by purchasing their own coffee machine, and in the Waikato that rises to 81%. We’ve also found that coffee machine owners drink more coffee after buying an espresso machine, with 75% of Aucklanders upping their caffeine intake post-purchase, followed by Cantabrians (73%).”

The decision to buy a coffee machine was an impulse purchase for a large minority of owners. Aucklanders were nearly twice as likely to buy a coffee machine on a whim, compared to those from other regions.

Bonnar says that the majority of owners are using their coffee machine every day.

“More than two thirds of owners are using their machines daily. It’s clear that they love their coffee and a staggering 85% show off their home-barista skills by making coffee for their guests.”

Breaking our coffee habits down by region:

Aucklanders: Most likely to purchase the same brand and flavour time and time again (63%). They are most likely to be confident in their at-home barista skills when making coffee for guests (88%), most likely to use their machine every day (75%), most likely to prefer the coffee they make at home to that bought in a café (71%), most likely to buy a coffee machine on impulse (61%), most likely to have drunk instant coffee at home before buying their coffee machine(78%) and most likely to drink more coffee since they bought their machine (75%).

Wellingtonians: Have remained loyal to their café culture with only 54% preferring their own coffee to that of their local baristas. They are also the least likely to drink more coffee since the purchase of their coffee machine (49%), least likely to have drunk instant coffee at home before buying a coffee machine (64%), and least likely to have saved money on café coffees since the purchase of their machine (70%).

Cantabrians: are least likely to be brand loyal as only 42% reach for the same flavour and brand time and time again. They are least likely to be confident in their at-home barista skills when making coffee for guests (78%), least likely to use their coffee machine everyday (56%), and equal least likely(with Waikato) to have bought their machine as an impulse purchase (33%).

Waikato people: are most likely to have saved money on café coffees since they bought their coffee machine (81%), least likely to rarely use their coffee machine (22%) and equal least likely (with Canterbury) to have bought their coffee machine on impulse (33%).

The survey asked respondents to rate their coffee machines across 8 categories:

1. Overall satisfaction with the coffee machine
2. Value for money
3. Reliability
4. Performance
5. Ease of use
6. Ease of cleaning and maintenance
7. Design
8. Taste of the coffee

Nespresso prevailed as the overall winner with near perfect scores across all eight categories, ahead of (in no particular order) Sunbeam, Breville and DeLonghi.

“Nespresso has a great range of machines that are very easy to use and produce a great ‘cup of joe’. With an innovative range of flavours and high end retail stores and internet purchasing Nespresso has set a very high standard for the rest of the market,” says Bonnar.

About the survey
Canstar Blue commissions Research Now to regularly survey 2,500 New Zealand consumers to measure their satisfaction across a range of products and services. The outcomes reported here are the results from a survey of consumers who have purchased an espresso machine in the last three years, in this case, 391 people. The survey has a margin of error +/- 5%

Age Groups:
Gen Y: 18-29
Gen X: 30-44
Baby Boomers: 45+

To view the full results of the Canstar Blue survey go to: www.canstarblue.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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