Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Radio funding keeps diverse voices and music on the airwaves

4 June 2014

Radio funding keeps diverse voices and music on the airwaves

NZ On Air has confirmed funding for 2014/15 to ensure a diverse range of voices, languages and music extend choice for all New Zealanders on radio stations throughout the country.

“The funding we provide for radio is diverse. Through it we support a huge range of programming made by and for local communities in 40 different languages, promote NZ music, and ensure children and minority audiences are catered for. This is at the core of our mandate under the Broadcasting Act. It is radio that you will not hear elsewhere and most is also available online,” says NZ On Air Chief Executive Jane Wrightson.

More than $2 million will support 12 regional Access stations. This funding supports the running of the stations – the programmes themselves are funded by the groups who make them.

A nationwide Pacific voice will continue to be heard through a $3.4 million investment. The National Pacific Radio Trust (NPRT), which runs 531pi and NiuFM, plus the Wellington-based Samoa Capital Radio, ensure Pacific peoples can keep their languages and culture alive in New Zealand.

NZ On Air also sponsors New Zealand music shows on student and alternative format radio stations. These programmes help increase the diversity of New Zealand music, and expose listeners to new artists. Combined funding of $960,000 for music programmes on nine radio stations has been confirmed.

Also included in the annual radio funding decisions are programmes for various commercial radio audiences for children, and covering specialist topics such as spirituality and mental health.

Annual funding for Radio New Zealand has been confirmed at $31.816 million (plus funding provided from the Digital Media Fund for thewireless.co.nz).

“We continue to be extremely proud of Radio New Zealand’s achievements and audience growth,” says Ms Wrightson.

Funding details
Radio New Zealand, $31.816 million
National Pacific Radio Trust, Niu FM, 531pi, $3.25 million
Samoa Capital Radio, $180,000

Access Stations
Access Manawatu, Lower North Island, $165,000
Access Radio Taranaki, Taranaki, $174,000
Arrow FM, Lower North Island, $135,000
Coast Access Radio, Lower North Island, $135,000
Free FM, Waikato/Lakes, $230,000
Fresh FM, Nelson/Marlborough, $195,000
Otago Access Radio, Otago, $169,000
Plains FM, Canterbury, $230,000
Planet FM, Auckland, $250,000
Radio Kidnappers, East Coast/Hawkes Bay, $170,000
Radio Southland, Southland, $165,000
Radio Reading Service, Lower North Island, $110,348

Music features
Kiwi FM, Auckland/Wellington/Christchurch, $260,000
95bFM, Auckland, $180,000
Base FM, Auckland & Freeview, $80,000
The Most FM, New Plymouth, $40,000
Radio Control, Palmerston North, $60,000
Radio Active, Wellington, $100,000
RDU, Christchurch, $100,000
Pulzar FM, Christchurch, $20,000
Radio One, Dunedin, $80,000

Commercial radio features
Paakiwaha, UMA Broadcasting for multiple stations, $75,000
Real Life With John Cowan, Christian Broadcasting Association for Newstalk ZB, $12,000
Scrubcutter, Christian Broadcasting Association for NewstalkZB, $70,000
The Great Big Kids Show – series 7, Treehut Ltd for multiple stations, $118,175
The Nutters Club Radio Show, The Key To Life Charitable Trust for NewstalkZB, $69,400

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Cosmetics & Pollution: Proposal To Ban Microbeads

Cosmetic products containing microbeads will be banned under a proposal announced by the Minister for the Environment today. Marine scientists have been advocating for a ban on the microplastics, which have been found to quickly enter waterways and harm marine life. More>>

ALSO:

NIWA: 2016 New Zealand’s Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the annual average) throughout the country, with very few locations observing near average temperatures (within 0.5°C of the annual average) or lower. The year 2016 was the warmest on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which begins in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

Farewell 2016: NZ Economy Flies Through 2016's Political Curveballs

Dec. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy batted away some curly political curveballs of 2016 to end the year on a high note, with its twin planks of a booming construction sector and rampant tourism soon to be joined by a resurgent dairy industry. More>>

ALSO:


NZ Economy: More Growth Than Expected In 3rd Qtr

Dec. 22 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the September quarter as a booming construction sector continued to underpin activity, spilling over into related building services, and was bolstered by tourism and transport ... More>>

  • NZ Govt - Solid growth for NZ despite fragile world economy
  • NZ Council of Trade Unions - Government needs to ensure economy raises living standards
  • KiwiRail Goes Deisel: Cans electric trains on partially electrified North Island trunkline

    Dec. 21 (BusinessDesk) – KiwiRail, the state-owned rail and freight operator, said a small fleet of electric trains on New Zealand’s North Island would be phased out over the next two years and replaced with diesel locomotives. More>>

  • KiwiRail - KiwiRail announces fleet decision on North Island line
  • Greens - Ditching electric trains massive step backwards
  • Labour - Bill English turns ‘Think Big’ into ‘Think Backwards’
  • First Union - Train drivers condemn KiwiRail’s return to “dirty diesel”
  • NZ First - KiwiRail Going Backwards for Xmas
  • NIWA: The Year's Top Science Findings

    Since 1972 NIWA has operated a Clean Air Monitoring Station at Baring Head, near Wellington... In June, Baring Head’s carbon dioxide readings officially passed 400 parts per million (ppm), a level last reached more than three million years ago. More>>

    ALSO:

    Get More From Scoop

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Business
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news