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New Muscle Slab foundation design ideal for Christchurch

New Muscle Slab[TM] foundation design ideal for Christchurch TC2 & TC3

Press release, Monday 9 June 2014, msHAPPEN Ltd, Christchurch, NZ: A new ready-to-build slab foundation system called Muscle Slab[TM] is now available for quake damaged homes in Christchurch. Designed and developed by consulting engineers, Bekker Engineering Design NZ, the new Muscle Slab system is ideal for TC2 and TC3 properties that are to be repaired or rebuilt.

It is estimated that of the 28,000 homes in the TC3 area alone, 10,000 will likely require a rebuild or significant foundation repairs, which will take many years to complete. With the Muscle Slab system msHAPPEN Ltd brings swift action and practical help to those in distress with damaged homes.

At the launch event in Christchurch last Friday msHAPPEN introduced the new Muscle Slab foundation system with demonstrations of screw pile installation and load and quake simulation deflection testing.

Richard Reid msHAPPEN General Manager says, “It’s more than three years since the February 2011 earthquake, and a significant number of Christchurch homes still have quake damaged foundations that need to be assessed, repaired or rebuilt. Identifying which repair strategy or foundation design is best depends on a number of factors from the extent of the damage sustained, the site specific geotechnical investigation results, to the weight and construction of the building.

“Muscle Slab is a dependable foundation option for homes in both TC2 and TC3 areas, as it comprises a proprietary modular structural ribbed ground slab with integrated proprietary helical screw piles. It is also simple and very quick to install.”

Because buildings in these areas are prone to damage from liquefaction in future significant earthquakes, a robust concrete foundation like Muscle Slab is favoured for its ability to better tie the building together. Integral to the design of this system are ductile screw piles that will allow for ground movement and ensure the slab will remain suspended and flexible to move with the shake.

Muscle Slab is specifically designed to make homes safer and stronger should liquefaction occur and, with high strength steel and concrete, it meets the foundation guidelines for TC2 and TC3. Home owners will be pleased to know that the Muscle Slab system is also competitively priced.

Muscle Slab Features

Muscle Slab is modular, with a profile configurable to any house footprint. It comes in two strengths and is suitable for any shape or size of home. It is the smart slab for rebuilding or replacement, where high engineering intelligence meets practical production techniques, providing a ready-to-build solution to Christchurch homes.

Muscle Slab combines a concrete pod slab and a steel screw pile system designed to meet some of the worst geotechnical conditions possible. It is suitable for re-slabbing under existing houses or new homes. Should an event cause liquefaction or subsidence of the ground under the slab, in anything but extreme cases, the slab will remain suspended and flexible to move with the shake.


• Simple and quick to install (ready to build)

• Suitable for any size or shape of house

• Stronger

• Thermally insulating

• Able to have services cast in

• A vibration-free installation method

• Suitable for TC2 and TC3 earthquake zones, areas subject to flooding and areas with suspect or contaminated soil

• Kinder to the environment

For more information on the Muscle Slab system, call msHAPPEN Ltd on 021 137 3625, or

© Scoop Media

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