Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Gull Calls for a Better Deal for High Octane Motorists

Gull Calls for a Better Deal for High Octane Motorists

Is a 30 or 40 cents per litre premium for high octane fair?

Auckland, 10 June 2014 - Family owned fuel retailer and champion of the kiwi motorist, Gull New Zealand today warned drivers of cars using high octane fuel not to get caught out when paying for petrol for their vehicles.

Dave Bodger General Manager Gull, says that many drivers of high octane vehicles are paying through the nose for fuel.

“Gull is a firm believer in brisk competition. In an informal survey conducted in Auckland last week, up to a quarter of service stations were being unfair to high octane motorists when pricing Premium grade petrol.”

Gull surveyed prices at 64 opposition outlets on 28 and 29 May - the day before and the day of Gull’s most recent 10 cent per litre discount promotion. Seventeen outlets chose to hold the price of Premium petrol while dropping the price of Regular 91.

“A high proportion of our competition is prepared to drop Regular 91 prices to match Gull,” says Bodger, “but have no interest in dropping Premium petrol prices. From our investigation some brands and outlets appear to have an inflexible approach to Premium prices regardless of how low Regular petrol falls in price. This is basic insincerity by my book.

“Gull keeps a constant price differential between Premium and Regular grade petrol, and we believe our competitors should too. With up to 1 in 4 keeping Premium prices high we think it is greedy profit taking and not a fair deal for consumers.

“To those of our competitors that are dragging the chain Premium fuel prices we say; If you can afford to match Gull on Regular then why not match on Premium as well?

“If we adopted the same policy as some of our opposition it would equate to over $1 million in additional revenue each year, and we are only 5% of the market. Gull won’t be changing its approach; we see this money as better invested in our customers. They need it, Gull doesn’t.”

Information

There are two legislated grades of petrol in New Zealand “Regular” with an octane rating of 91 or more and “Premium” with an octane rating of at least 95. All Gull outlets that sell Premium grade petrol sell Gull Force 10 a 98 octane grade. Two other brands retail 98 octane Premium at some outlets and 95 octane Premium at other outlets. The remaining two major fuel brands sell only a 95 Octane Premium.

In general:
· 95 Octane prices are 8 to 10 cents per litre higher at the pump than Regular.
· 98 Octane is 15 to 17 cents per litre higher at the pump than Regular.

Gull aims to have a Gull Force 10 prices at no more than 15 cents per litre above Gull Regular.
Invariably service stations only display the Regular 91 Octane and diesel price on road side price signs.
Premium petrol represents around 20% of all petrol sold in New Zealand
Octane is a measure an engine’s resistance to “knocking”, “pinking” or pre ignition. Engines can knock or pink when under load a higher octane petrol maintains correct ignition and correct power output.

Engines with higher compression ratios in general require a higher octane petrol to work than other engines. Performance vehicles in general have a higher compression ratio.

Motorists should always follow their manufacturer’s recommendation for octane required. NEVER use a lower octane than your manufacturer notes

Prices at service stations where Gull controls prices as at 10am on June 6:

Gull Regular 91: $1.969 to $2.129 per litre,
an average of $2.075 per litre

Gull Force 10: (98 Octane Premium): $2.119 and $2.279 per litre
an average of $2.224 per litre

Gull Ultra Low Sulphur Diesel: $ 1.359 and $ 1.469 per litre
an average of $1.409 per litre

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Cosmetics & Pollution: Proposal To Ban Microbeads

Cosmetic products containing microbeads will be banned under a proposal announced by the Minister for the Environment today. Marine scientists have been advocating for a ban on the microplastics, which have been found to quickly enter waterways and harm marine life. More>>

ALSO:

NIWA: 2016 New Zealand’s Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the annual average) throughout the country, with very few locations observing near average temperatures (within 0.5°C of the annual average) or lower. The year 2016 was the warmest on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which begins in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

Farewell 2016: NZ Economy Flies Through 2016's Political Curveballs

Dec. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy batted away some curly political curveballs of 2016 to end the year on a high note, with its twin planks of a booming construction sector and rampant tourism soon to be joined by a resurgent dairy industry. More>>

ALSO:


NZ Economy: More Growth Than Expected In 3rd Qtr

Dec. 22 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the September quarter as a booming construction sector continued to underpin activity, spilling over into related building services, and was bolstered by tourism and transport ... More>>

  • NZ Govt - Solid growth for NZ despite fragile world economy
  • NZ Council of Trade Unions - Government needs to ensure economy raises living standards
  • KiwiRail Goes Deisel: Cans electric trains on partially electrified North Island trunkline

    Dec. 21 (BusinessDesk) – KiwiRail, the state-owned rail and freight operator, said a small fleet of electric trains on New Zealand’s North Island would be phased out over the next two years and replaced with diesel locomotives. More>>

  • KiwiRail - KiwiRail announces fleet decision on North Island line
  • Greens - Ditching electric trains massive step backwards
  • Labour - Bill English turns ‘Think Big’ into ‘Think Backwards’
  • First Union - Train drivers condemn KiwiRail’s return to “dirty diesel”
  • NZ First - KiwiRail Going Backwards for Xmas
  • NIWA: The Year's Top Science Findings

    Since 1972 NIWA has operated a Clean Air Monitoring Station at Baring Head, near Wellington... In June, Baring Head’s carbon dioxide readings officially passed 400 parts per million (ppm), a level last reached more than three million years ago. More>>

    ALSO:

    Get More From Scoop

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Business
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news