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Kiwi Company Lands Re-entry Pads in Atlantis

Kiwi Company Lands Re-entry Pads in Atlantis

The Atlantis Resort in the Bahamas became the first water park to install a new water safety product named the “re-entry pad.”

The innovative design dramatically improves safety of any aquatic inflatable obstacles by ensuring that re-entry is at water level, and can sustain a swimmer’s full body weight during the climb.

Engineers from Aflex Technology in New Zealand designed this safety solution specifically to meet the needs of commercial inflatable water parks. Their new safety re-entry pads allow swimmers to quickly climb back onto any obstacle and can be used even by younger children.

Design team engineers, under direction of chief designer Martin Stratford, oversaw installation of the brand-new swimmer safety solution for the Cartoon Network’s theme park at Atlantis Resort Bahamas.

Safety is paramount for the mega sized Cartoon Network inflatable water park, and Aflex Technology finished integrating the new re-entry pads last week. The overall theme park is filled with 18 obstacles floating in the lagoon and 13 re-entry units.

Aflex Technology manufactured all the inflatable obstacles, which covers an area of 61 by 50 metres . Aflex incorporated these obstacles and slides to form a unique water theme park for the Bahamas based resort.

Many of the theme park’s obstacles are large, some as high as 5 metres. These large structures are often impossible for swimmers to remount, especially for smaller children.

By using their newly engineered technology for connecting the inflatable obstacles, the re-entry pads, composed of large fabric sheets on a platform and two metre long inflated tubes, are attached so that swimmers can swim directly onto any of the obstacles on the course.

A member of the Aflex design team, Bren Ellis says, “our connective sleeves ensure that the inflatable obstacles never separate under load, and do not use Velcro or rope attachments.” Other alternative attachment types can fail over time.

Tested to comply with multiple standards these re-entry pads are engineered to withstand the maximum load on the obstacles and to last for several years in the sun drenched lagoon.

Maurice Gionotti, who tested the re-entry pads at Lake Taupo, says, “It has been very successful, particularly suitable for even the youngest child to get on and off without any difficulty.”

The re-entry pads are a newly engineered safety concept that can now be used for many different types of water activities in which people need to exit the water easily, including marine rescue.

Aflex Technology has been engineering obstacle courses and other inflatable products since November 1995, and is a 100% New Zealand owned and operated company. Using heavy duty fabrics, and design innovations, Aflex inflatables allow heavy commercial use lasting for years.

ends

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