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Storm claims flood in, says AA Insurance

Storm claims flood in, says AA Insurance

Auckland – 11 June 2014 – AA Insurance is urging customers requiring emergency repairs after last night’s storm to call as soon as possible.

“Winds reached tropical cyclone levels in the upper North Island and brought down trees, cut power and damaged properties,” says Suzanne Wolton, Head of Customer Relations, AA Insurance, “so we’re keen to hear from our customers who need emergency repairs to their homes in order to keep them watertight and warm.”

AA Insurance has already received over 100 storm damage claims for home, contents and car damage, with the majority of claims from Auckland as a result of the weather last night. Few claims had been received after the flooding in Canterbury the previous day, but as the current storm moves to the east and south of the North Island, AA Insurance expects this number to rise over the comings days.

“As the storm isn’t yet over it’s too early to estimate the cost of damage, but we’ve put on additional staff to cover the volume of calls we’ve received this morning, which has increased around six-fold from our usual numbers.

“The most common types of storm damage have been to roofs, windows, and fences. We’ve had trees falling through windows or onto fences and roofs, there has been flooding throughout homes, and tiles lifted or completely gone, leaving holes that have allowed water damage to ceilings.

“One customer said that part of their fence had broken, leaving a gaping hole for the dog to escape, while parts of the fence had been caught by the wind and broke a window. They also had rainwater making its way through the kitchen bi-fold doors, which had soaked the floor.

“There is no rush to make a claim, but the sooner you let us know, the sooner we can help you. Although if you need emergency repairs, such as mending a hole in your roof, or replacing smashed window panes, then ring us as soon as you can,” continued Suzanne. “Our team is experienced in handling these weather-related claims and can give our customers the help they need to get things sorted quickly.”

As the bad weather moves down the North Island, those expecting the storms to hit should make preparations for their home.

“Now’s the time to check your property and repair anything that may be damaged, or could cause damage to another part of your, or your neighbours’, property,” says Suzanne. “Also be sure to store away or secure items that may be move during a storm, such as garden equipment, outdoor furniture and sports gear such as trampolines.”

AA Insurance advises its customers to:

• Secure or move your outdoor furniture inside

• Unplug appliances which may be affected by electrical power surges. If power is lost unplug major appliances

• Pull curtains and drapes over windows to prevent injury from shattered or flying glass

• Do not attempt to repair any damage until it is safe to do so

• If there is water in your light fittings, turn your lights off and call an electrician immediately

• If it is safe to do so, place a tarpaulin over any areas where the roof is leaking

• If the floors are wet, lift your furniture off the floor to prevent staining

• Keep your damaged items if you can or take photos – this is useful to confirm what needs replacing

• AA Insurance customers should call us as soon as possible on 0800 500 216 to report any damage to your property especially if you need emergency repairs.

ENDS


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