Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Small Kiwi Company named the world’s ‘fairest trader’

Small Kiwi Company named the world’s ‘fairest trader’

Most Kiwis believe everyone deserves a ‘fair go’ and according to Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian, author and scholar David Hackett Fischer, “on the subject of fairness, no nation in the world has more to teach than New Zealand.”

Now a small Kiwi food & drink company has been recognised as one of the fairest in the world.

Fairtrade International, a global not-for-profit organisation that oversees 27,000 products that carry the Fairtrade mark in 120 countries, has named New Zealand’s All Good Organics as the world’s ‘fairest trader.’

The accolade will be announced at the International Fairtrade Awards, which take place as part of Fairtrade International General Assembly in Bonn, Germany on Friday June 13, at 4.30am (NZT). The Fairtrade International Fairtrade Trader award recognises outstanding and special efforts from traders worldwide, especially those involved in innovative projects and programmes.

According to International Fairtrade Awards judges, All Good ‘demonstrated a strong commitment to Fairtrade and engagement with Fairtrade producers; for having created an innovative Fairtrade product and for their significant contributions to the growth of Fairtrade sales and awareness in New Zealand.’

Kiwi owned and operated All Good are known in New Zealand for Fairtrade Bananas helping small banana farmers in Ecuador and Samoa and more recently with Karma Cola, a soft drink that is helping people in Sierra Leone rebuild their lives in the aftermath of war.

There’s a 1950’s song that goes, “if you want to be the top banana you have to start at the bottom of the bunch,” says All Good Director and Founder Simon Coley. “It certainly applies to us. The banana industry is big, its history isn’t pretty, it’s littered with failed dreams and there have been many times we’ve wondered if we’d bitten off more than we could chew. When we launched New Zealand’s first Fairtrade bananas just over four years ago we were told that no one would want to pay $1 more a bunch. But we’ve shown Kiwis where their bananas come from and why it's a good idea to buy the ones that directly support growers, their families and the environment – the All Good ones.

“The international Fairtrade Trader award is fantastic recognition for our team and the work we’ve done to put All Good Fairtrade bananas on the map in New Zealand. Kiwi consumers have rallied behind our truly ethical fruit and we are now on sale in supermarkets throughout the country.

“Support from conscious Kiwi consumers gave us the confidence to create Karma Cola – to do the same for soft drinks and give a face and a voice, for the first time in the history of cola, to the people who grow its naming ingredient in Sierra Leone.”

Simon Coley, Chris Morrison founder of Phoenix Organics and his brother Matt Morrison conceived the idea for All Good on a West Auckland beach over 5 years ago. They started with bananas because they are the most consumed supermarket commodity and arguably one of the least ethical. In 2010 they began importing New Zealand’s first Fairtrade bananas from the El Guabo Fairtrade cooperative of small banana farmers in Ecuador.

In 2012, they launched Karma Cola to address the injustice in the fact that every day the world consumes more than 1.7 billion cola drinks, yet very few contain real cola and the people who grow the name ingredient don’t get a cent. Proceeds from the sale of every bottle are going back to the Boma village in Sierra Leone to help the people who grow the cola rebuild their lives in the aftermath of war.

Four years on, All Good bananas can be found in supermarkets throughout the country and Karma Cola and its brother and sister drinks Lemmy and Gingerella, are now on sale in cafes, restaurants and bars throughout New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, Macau and Singapore, and as of last month London. An idea that came to life in West Auckland is now benefitting people in West Africa, Ecuador, Samoa, Sri Lanka and India.

All Good Bananas are also on sale in New World, Pak’nSave and Four Square, and independent grocers such as Moore Wilson, Farro Fresh, Fruit World, Nosh and Huckleberry Farms.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gareth Morgan: The Government’s Fresh Water Policy – Revisited

Fresh water quality is the latest area to be in the sights of Gareth Morgan and his research organisation The Morgan Foundation... They found that the fresh water policy was a bit murkier than the Environment Minister let on. More>>

ALSO:

Interest Rates: RBNZ Hikes OCR To 3.5%, ‘Period Of Assessment’ Now Needed

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler raised the official cash rate as expected, while signalling a pause in rate hikes to assess the impact of moves so far this year. The kiwi dollar sank after Wheeler said its strength was “unjustified” and that the currency could have “a significant fall.” More>>

ALSO:

Fonterra: Canpac Site 'Resize' To Focus More On Paediatrics

Fonterra is looking at realigning its packing operations at Canpac, in the Waikato, to focus more on paediatric nutritionals... The proposed changes could mean around 110 roles may not be required at the site which currently employs 330. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Postie Plus Brand Gets 2nd Chance With Well-Funded Pepkor

The Postie Plus brand is getting a new lease of life after South Africa’s Pepkor bought the failed retailer’s assets out of administration and said it will use its purchasing power to reduce costs of stock and fatten margins. More>>

ALSO:

Warming: Warming Signs From State Of Climate Report

Climate data from air, land, sea and ice in 2013 'reflect trends of a warming planet' -- says the latest State of the Climate report, launched by U.S. and New Zealand scientists. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Embrace Falling Home Affordability, Says NZIER

Despair over the inability to afford a house is misplaced and should be embraced as an opportunity to invest in more wealth-creating activity, says the principal economist at the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research, Shamubeel Eaqub. More>>

Productivity Commission: NZ Regulation Not Keeping Pace

New Zealand regulators often have to work with out-of-date legislation, quality checks are under strain, and regulatory workers need better training and development. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news