Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Chatham Rock advises start of marine consent submissions

Chatham Rock Phosphate advises start of marine consent submission process


Chatham Rock Phosphate Limited (CRP) is pleased to advise the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) has now publicly notified CRP’s marine consent application to mine phosphate nodules from the Chatham Rise in New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone.

The public notification in major daily newspapers means the submission period on CRP’s application has now opened and will conclude at 5 pm on 10 July 2014. Following the close of this submission period the EPA will then have 20 working days in which it considers the submissions before issuing a hearing notice.

The decision making committee to consider CRP’s application has also been confirmed. The EPA Board has appointed a committee of experienced decision-makers, with collective expertise in ecology, engineering and tikanga Maori, to decide the application. Chair of the committee is former career diplomat Neil Walter. The other members are Dr. Nicki Crauford (EPA Board representative), Dr. Gregory Ryder, Lennie Johns and David Hill.

EPA Chief Executive Rob Forlong said in a media release the EPA was committed to carrying out a robust decision-making process. The decision-making committee would consider all submissions made by the public and people could choose to speak directly to the panel at public hearings.

“In order to make the best decision, the committee needs to be aware of as much relevant information as possible. We want to hear how a proposal might affect existing interests in the area and the environment. We’re looking for information that may affect the outcome of a decision or that would help to develop conditions that could be imposed if an application was approved.”

Mr. Forlong said all relevant materials will be provided on the EPA website and regular updates provided to all parties. Full details about the application, the decision-making committee and how to make a submission are available on the EPA website www.epa.govt.nz/eez.

CRP is seeking to mine phosphate nodules from the Chatham Rise (250-450 m depth) 450 km east of Christchurch. It has a mining permit from New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals (NZP&M) for an 820 sq km area on the Chatham Rise, which forms part of the total area (10,192 sq km) for which a marine consent is being sought from the EPA. The remaining area may be mined in the future depending on research results and obtaining relevant permits from NZP&M. CRP is proposing to mine at least 30 sq. km of seabed annually to meet its annual minimum production target of 1.5 million tonnes of phosphate nodules.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Must Sell 20 Petrol Stations: Z Cleared To Buy Caltex Assets

Z Energy is allowed to buy the Caltex and Challenge! petrol station chains but must sell 19 of its retail sites and one truck-stop, the Commerce Commission has ruled in a split decision that acknowledges possible retail price coordination between fuel retailers occurs in some regions. More>>

ALSO:

Huntly: Genesis Extends Life Of Coal-Fuelled Power Station To 2022

Genesis Energy will keep its two coal and gas-fired units at Huntly Power Station operating until 2022, having previously said they'd be closed by 2018, after wringing a high price from other electricity generators who wanted to keep them as back-up. More>>

ALSO:

Dammed If You Do: Ruataniwha Irrigation Scheme Hits Farmer Uptake Targets

Enough Hawke's Bay farmers have signed up for water from the proposed Ruataniwha Water Storage Scheme for it to go ahead as long as a cornerstone institutional capital investor can be found to back it, its regional council promoter announced. More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank: OCR Stays At 2.25%

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 2.25 percent, in a decision traders had said could go either way, while predicting inflation will pick up as the slump in oil prices washes out of the data and capacity pressures start to build in the economy. More>>

ALSO:

Export Values Down: NZ Posts Biggest Annual Trade Deficit In 7 Years

New Zealand has recorded its biggest annual trade deficit since April 2009, reflecting weaker prices of agricultural commodities such as dairy products, beef and lamb, and increased imports of vehicles and machinery. More>>

ALSO:

Currency Events: NZ's New $5 Note Wins International Banknote Award

New Zealand’s new Brighter Money $5 note has been named Banknote of the Year in a prestigious international competition. The $5 note was awarded the IBNS Banknote of the Year title at the International Bank Note Society’s annual meeting. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news