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Trade Me's 'MOD' to resign after a decade

Trade Me's 'MOD' to resign after a decade

By Suze Metherell

June 17 (BusinessDesk) - Trade Me Group’s chief operating officer Mike O’Donnell, better known as MOD, has announced his resignation from the online auction site.

O’Donnell has been with the company for a decade, and said it was “time I turned my hand to something different.” An exact end date is yet to be announced, but he will be involved in the transition period and is expected to remain in the role until at least mid-August.

“MOD has made a huge contribution to Trade Me over the last decade,” chief executive Jon Macdonald said. “He helped build our classifieds verticals, has run our business operations and regulatory functions, and most recently led our Marketplace division."

O'Donnell is responsible for the site's marketplace and operations teams after originally leading Trade Me's commercial division when he arrived in 2004. He has worked for Gareth Morgan Investments, AMP Capital Investors, Fonterra Cooperative Group and Forestry Corporation.

The outgoing chief operating officer writes Trade Me's MOD’s Motors newsletter, something he said he’d continue to do provided Trade Me agrees to his “extortionate payment demand of a 44-gallon drum of 98 octane for each issue.”

The shares in the NZX-listed company rose 0.3 percent to $3.60, and have declined 24 percent in the past year.

(BusinessDesk)

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