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Wānanga contributes $57m to GDP

Wānanga contributes $57m to GDP

Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi contributes $57million to New Zealand GDP, according to a report prepared by Business and Economic Research Limited (BERL).

The Wānanga Ringahora report quantifies the contribution of the wānanga sector to New Zealand’s economy. It was prepared on behalf of Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa and Te Wānanga o Raukawa, and was launched at Te Raukura Wharewaka Function Centre in Wellington on Wednesday (18 June 2014).

The report says the Wānanga employs approximately 517 full-time equivalents.

Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi Professor of Māori and Indigenous Research Annemarie Gillies and economist Rawinia Kamau noted that the economic impact of Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi is positive for the Bay of Plenty and Mātaatua region.

“The fact that the main campus is in Whakatāne signals that a large proportion of this contribution comes directly into the Whakatāne community.

“In addition to the quantitative value of the contribution, further celebration can come from the qualitative benefits that such a value of GDP creates for families in communities like ours.”

The Wānanga has been working on a research project with iwi, Māori communities and the wider community to develop new models that will assist in transforming social and economic conditions and opportunities.

Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi CEO and Vice-Chancellor Distinguished Professor Graham Hingangaroa Smith said that while the report shows contributions to specific communities, the wider intention is to build an evidence-based foundation to assist the wānanga sector to be even more productive in its educational and socio-economic impact for the benefit of Māori and all New Zealanders.

Ends

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