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Third Generation Puzzle Maker Celebrate 75 Years

Third Generation Puzzle Maker Celebrate 75 Years

This month, Kiwi puzzle maker, Thos Holdsworth & Sons are celebrating 75 years of manufacturing and exporting their iconic Holdson puzzles.

Mr Simon Holdsworth, grandson of founder Thomas Holdsworth and now company director says this milestone means a lot to the company and the hundreds of Kiwis who have worked for Thos Holdsworth & Sons over 75 years of successful operation.

“We’ve been through some incredibly hard times over the years and owe many thanks to our committed team of employees and puzzle fans for keeping alive our principles and the values on which my family built the company,” says Mr Holdsworth.

Thos Holdsworth & Sons was established in July 1939 after discovering a gap in the New Zealand market for wooden puzzles. Encouraged by the idea of making something tangible Thomas Holdsworth invested in pedal powered jig saw machines, plywood and out of date calendar prints to make the very first Holdson puzzle.

“Our wooden puzzles were very popular throughout the 1940’s but after the war, we found it difficult to keep up with supply and demand so made the switch to cardboard which is easier to cut, pack and ship,” Says Mr Holdsworth.

At the beginning of 1940’s, Thos Holdsworth & Sons started exporting Holdson puzzles to Australia and sometime later opportunity knocked to enter Hong Kong, Singapore and the Pacific Islands. Today, the business has since grown to be the largest puzzle maker in Australasia.

Simon says this anniversary is about celebrating the history of Holdson puzzles and encouraging people to embrace the simple pleasures of puzzling the old fashioned way, without turning on a computer or smart phone.

“Generations of New Zealanders have enjoyed our puzzles for 75 years; from putting their first piece into a frame tray, experiencing the fun of assembling a giant puzzle as a family to the rare pleasure of taking time out to tackle a 1000pc puzzle,” says Mr Holdsworth.

“We hope the joy our puzzles bring to our consumers will continue for many years to come,” adds Mr Holdsworth.

As part of the 75th Anniversary Celebration Holdson have released a Limited Edition collection of four 1000pc puzzles that have been specially selected to mark this occasion.

Puzzle lovers who buy any three specially marked Holdson 1000pc puzzles will be able to send away for one of the Limited Edition 75th Anniversary (1000pc) puzzles for free (while stocks last).

ENDS

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