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Don’t Score an Own Goal – Take the Day Off

Don’t Score an Own Goal – Take the Day Off

Managers will be more alert to leave of absence during World Cup

Auckland, JUNE 2014 – Employers are very aware of employees taking sick leave or calling in late as the nation catches football fever during this year’s World Cup, says recruitment & HR service specialists, Randstad.

Temptation amongst employees to “call in sick” or inform their colleagues they are “going to be late” throughout the tournament is likely to be on the increase. And with the majority of second round and final matches starting at either 3.30am NZT or 7.45am NZT, it won’t be a shock to management when employees call in with their excuses.

Paul Robinson, Director of Randstad New Zealand, says management are likely to be prepared for the World Cup to impact productivity and staffing levels, so if they haven’t planned ahead to openly discuss the issue with employees and manage resources during this time, they will keep a watchful eye to see who is doing the right or wrong thing by the business.

“We recommend soccer fanatics request leave for the day of your favourite games, so you can truly enjoy them guilt free. You’ll be doing the right thing by your team, your boss and your employer, which will be greatly appreciated. Turning up last minute will leave you scrutinised and can damage your performance, productivity, achievements and reputation, particularly if you miss an important meeting or project deadline.

“You wouldn’t see Cristiano Ronaldo letting team Portugal down, so our advice is not to let your colleagues down. Instead plan effectively and pre-arrange leave time with your boss,” says Robinson.

“With many businesses embracing the spirit of the World Cup, to boost morale, launch themed sales competitions, celebrate diversity and have some fun in the workplace, there will be plenty of opportunities to bring that passion for soccer into work,” explains Robinson.

– ENDS –

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