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Telecom Unleashes Super Fast Broadband Across North Island

Telecom Unleashes Super Fast Broadband Across North Island with Ultrafast Fibre


Telecom, soon to be Spark, announced today that it is launching Ultra Fibre Broadband for residential and business customers across Tauranga, Hamilton, Te Awamutu, Cambridge, Tokoroa, New Plymouth, and Hawera.

To bring the super fast broadband to homes and businesses across the Upper North Island regions, Telecom has partnered with infrastructure provider Ultrafast Fibre – adding broadband to the Corporate and School solutions launched earlier this year.

Telecom Ultra Fibre customers can choose from simple, competitively-priced, ultra-fast broadband plans. These range from an entry-level 40GB residential plan starting at $85 per month, right up to the “Giganaire” plan - offering unlimited broadband from $99 a month when bundled with one of Telecom’s Ultra Mobile plans.

Telecom Retail COO, Jason Paris said he was confident that residents in the UltraFast Fibre regions will be very happy with the experience UFB will give them.

“Customers who’ve made the move love it because it delivers a better quality internet experience than they receive on a standard copper line. With the best available consistency of speed to your home, this means a better gaming, TV and video streaming, downloading and uploading experience for users – particularly for families with multiple devices.

“For businesses, Ultra Fibre opens the door to greater use of cloud-based applications to improve business productivity. Other business applications such as video conferencing between offices or customers are a smooth as butter on Ultra Fibre. By adopting UFB, New Zealand business are also future-proofing themselves for technologies we can’t even imagine yet but that will come out over the next 5, 10, 20 years. After all, 15 years ago, how many of us had email access on our phones?” says Paris.

Jason Paris says that that the speeds Telecom offers fulfil the needs of most fibre customers and today’s residential offer complements the business fibre solution that Telecom launched to their corporate clients last year.

“Customers on Telecom’s Ultra Fibre can choose the speed range that suits them best from either our Ultra Fibre 30 or our Ultra Fibre 100 plans” says Paris.

Residents of streets where fibre infrastructure has been installed by UltraFast Fibre can sign up for Ultra Fibre online at Telecom.co.nz/addresschecker or by calling 123.

Wanganui residents who live in an Ultrafast Fibre area can expect Telecom Ultra Fibre Broadband to be available to them soon.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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