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Airport taxi drop-off location about to change

Airport taxi drop-off location about to change

Safety is one of the reasons taxi customers at Christchurch Airport will soon be collected from a new specifically designated area outside the terminal.

Chief Commercial Officer Blair Forgie says the current drop-off zone under the main parking building has become congested with private and commercial vehicles.

“The congestion has been highlighted in recent months by increased passenger numbers through the terminal and associated increased traffic around the terminal. We recognise that, so are planning and evolving traffic management,” says Mr Forgie.

“We currently have people opening car doors and stepping out into a stream of traffic in the drop-off area, recently re-named The Loop. Our staff have witnessed near-misses there so we’ve decided to make changes. From July 1, we will separate commercial and private drop-off zones, with all taxi passenger transfers at their current collection area.

“From the new pick-up and drop-off site at the international end of the terminal, taxi customers will get out of or into their taxi in an area where only professional drivers operate and where customers will get under cover and into the terminal in a few footsteps.

“We are acutely aware shelter at the new taxi site needs improvement and are working on designing and installing it there as soon as possible.”

The new drop-off area for taxis coincides with the fee taxis pay to access the airport being halved and made transparent to the public, following extensive engagement between the airport company and taxi companies.

Mr Forgie says the reduced fare of $5.50 has been public knowledge since late April and comes into effect next Tuesday.

“In the past, there has been some confusion about the access fee and customers have told us of high fees charged and attributed to the airport. Every passenger will now see the airport fee is $5.50 for every trip to or from the airport.

“From July 1, the access fee will also be openly displayed on signage at the airport and on our website,” he says.


“We will continue discussions with the taxi companies as these changes are introduced, to ensure we provide a safer and more transparent environment for consumers and commercial vehicle operators alike.”

ends

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