Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Board of Inquiry backs dam project with conditions

Board of Inquiry backs dam project with conditions

June 24 (BusinessDesk) - The Board of Inquiry into the $230 million Ruataniwha Dam project in Hawke’s Bay has granted resource consents subject to strict conditions.

The board made its final decision after hearing from 131 witnesses and considering 28,000 pages of conflicting and highly technical material relating to the controversial plan. The plan is for the largest irrigation dam in New Zealand, and the largest dam to be built in the country for 20 years.

"A major issue concerned the balancing of intensification of land use with the protection of the environment, in particular the river system within the Tukituki catchment,” the board said. “Cultural issues, especially the relationship between Maori and the waters in the catchment, were also prominent.”

The Hawke's Bay Regional Council and its investment company are studying the final decision and will take several days to respond. The council voted yesterday to invest up to $80 million in the project.

The board adopted a dual nutrient approach in a plan change required for the project to manage both phosphorous and nitrogen in the Tukituki catchment, ditching the contentious ‘single nutrient’ approach proposed in the draft plan.

It has set an in-stream dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) limit and target, as well as on-land leaching rates for nitrogen.

All farms within the Tukituki catchment that exceed 4 hectares for intensive farming and 10ha for non-intensive farming have to prepare a farm management plan and face stock management requirements in respect of waterways.

Proposed minimum flows for rivers have been endorsed by the board but the board has increased the volume of groundwater that may be consented for irrigation from an aquifer.

The board was appointed by the Minister for the Environment and Minister of Conservation on June 5.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news