Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Smart Trawling prototype to protect the seabed

Smart Trawling prototype to protect the seabed

Prototype technology unveiled by Sealord is being developed to provide skippers with a real-time view of the ocean floor and equipment while fishing, resulting in smart trawling and a reduction in the impacts of fishing on the seabed.


With deep sea fishing that occurs in depths of over 200 metres, fishermen have never before been able to observe the fish, and operated in the dark with guess work as to how they behave when they encounter fishing gear.

“It will be like driving at night with headlights and full visuals at depths of up to 1000m for the first time, versus navigating only on instruments,” explained Sealord Resource Manager, Graham Patchell.

“This is the first step in technology to be more accurate with trawls and work towards having a lighter footprint on the marine environment with less coral and sponges caught in nets. Rather than waiting to see what comes up in the trawl, we will see it in real time and be able to take action.”

The equipment is the trawl mounted acoustic and optical system (AOS) further developed to provide real-time data and visuals through an armoured fibre optic cable, deployed from a separate winch but computer linked to the main trawl system.

Sealord has developed this technology over the past five years in partnership with the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation). The partnership is testing the new high definition camera and equipment in a world first trial which sets sail from Nelson this weekend.

Fibre optic cabling is well known for better performance, speed of data transfer and ability to carry larger amounts of visual data. This, along with the powerful lighting equipment will provide Sealords skippers a real-time view of the trawl gear and the ocean floor and enable them to target fish and move away from underwater features.

The new equipment has been installed on FV Thomas Harrison over the past two weeks and will be used during orange roughy biomass surveys in two fishing areas off the West Coast of the North Island.

By being able to observe the fish in their natural habitats the company will also get a far greater understanding of how fish behave and the equipment will provide the most efficient and accurate tool for stock assessment. Accurate targeting of species also means the ability to catch quota in a way that saves valuable time and fuel.

According to Sealords General Manager Fishing, Doug Paulin, its early days but the development is part of the companys ongoing commitment to developing the best science and innovation to deliver the worlds most sustainable fish.

“Sealords investment in research and technology has already resulted in better knowledge about the orange roughy fisheries and three of them have now entered Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) sustainability certification.

“Our commitment to sustainability goes beyond healthy fish stocks and we are investing in an ecosystem approach to make sure we take as much care with the marine environment as we do with the fisheries,” said Paulin.

Sealord and CSIROs Smart Trawling technology follows an innovative project to develop a multi-frequencyAcoustic Optical System (AOS) – deep sea technology that allows scientists to use acoustics (sound) at different frequencies, and optics (visuals) to better understand fish and the marine environment.

This equipment has provided some never before seen footage of orange roughy and sharks at depths of more than 1000m and better, more accurate information about the species.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop Business: Leighton-Led WGP To Build, Manage Transmission Gully

The Wellington Gateway Partnership, led by a unit of ASX-listed Leighton Holdings, has won the $1 billion contract to build the Transmission Gully road north of Wellington. More>>

ALSO:

Gareth Morgan: The Government’s Fresh Water Policy – Revisited

Fresh water quality is the latest area to be in the sights of Gareth Morgan and his research organisation The Morgan Foundation... They found that the fresh water policy was a bit murkier than the Environment Minister let on. More>>

ALSO:

Interest Rates: RBNZ Hikes OCR To 3.5%, ‘Period Of Assessment’ Now Needed

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler raised the official cash rate as expected, while signalling a pause in rate hikes to assess the impact of moves so far this year. The kiwi dollar sank after Wheeler said its strength was “unjustified” and that the currency could have “a significant fall.” More>>

ALSO:

Fonterra: Canpac Site 'Resize' To Focus More On Paediatrics

Fonterra is looking at realigning its packing operations at Canpac, in the Waikato, to focus more on paediatric nutritionals... The proposed changes could mean around 110 roles may not be required at the site which currently employs 330. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Postie Plus Brand Gets 2nd Chance With Well-Funded Pepkor

The Postie Plus brand is getting a new lease of life after South Africa’s Pepkor bought the failed retailer’s assets out of administration and said it will use its purchasing power to reduce costs of stock and fatten margins. More>>

ALSO:

Warming: Warming Signs From State Of Climate Report

Climate data from air, land, sea and ice in 2013 'reflect trends of a warming planet' -- says the latest State of the Climate report, launched by U.S. and New Zealand scientists. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news