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Safer commercial health services protect public

Safer commercial health services protect public

A new health and hygiene bylaw comes into place tomorrow (1 July) requiring safer practices in Auckland’s health and beauty businesses to protect the consumer.

The Auckland Council bylaw requires all commercial services that risk breaking, burning or piercing the skin to be licensed.

Mervyn Chetty, Auckland Council Manager Environmental Health says the display of a Health Protection Licence provides an assurance that a business meets health regulations.

“The new bylaw encourages best practice across a range of commercial services, such as tattooing, body piercing, hair removal, indoor tanning and nail services. A code of practice also sets minimum standards that must be complied with, reducing potential risks to public health.

“The public should also look out for evidence of qualifications, as minimum training standards are also required for most of these services,” he says.

There has recently been widespread concern around sub-standard practices in nail bars throughout the country, as well as the on-going use of sunbeds despite the risks. Early engagement with the industry about these issues has meant the council’s new regulations have gained the support of both practitioners and public health advocates.

In a New Zealand first, commercial sunbed businesses in the Auckland region must to be licensed and comply with a new code of practice which includes restricting the treatment to those 18 years and over.

The Cancer Society of Auckland congratulated the council on taking the lead in developing a Code of Practice and regulation to address the risks associated with UV radiation sunbeds.

John Loof, Chief Executive Cancer Society Auckland said it was heartening to see Auckland Council leading the way for the rest of the country.

“Sunbeds have been shown to increase the risk of melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer and regulating and restricting their use is a great step forward.”

Ends

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