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Shipping Investment a Positive First Step

Shipping Investment a Positive First Step

The New Zealand Shippers’ Council (NZSC) welcomes last week’s announcement by Kotahi and the Port of Tauranga that will allow the Port to commence a long-term investment programme to enable it to receive bigger ships.

This step was a key recommendation in the New Zealand Shippers’ Council’s 2010 ‘Big Ships Report’. It is a positive move that will help exporters capture significant savings and remain competitive on the world stage, with continued access to overseas markets directly from New Zealand.

However, NZSC Executive Officer, Peter Morris said this is just the first step. “This announcement should not stop Auckland, Lyttleton and Otago continuing their investment to accommodate bigger ships. This will ensure they can support the future growth forecast in both exports and imports, and diversify risk away from a single port strategy.”

‘’This is a very significant and important development in our international supply chain and should be seen as the first of a number of developments and not the end game,” said Mr Morris.

The investment by the Port of Tauranga to dredge the Port and bring in bigger ships will not just benefit the container sector – the break bulk sector will also gain from the changes.

It is now up to NZSC members to work with carriers to ensure the necessary collaboration happens to fill the big ships without a significant lessening of competition. This will help protect New Zealand's international competitiveness for the long term. -ENDS-

If you would like more information, please contact Peter Morris at New Zealand Shippers’ Council on 021 564 154 or email: nzsc.executiveofficer@gmail.com

About The New Zealand Shippers’ Council www.shipperscouncil.co.nz

The Council is a not-for-profit organisation representing the supply chain interests of major New Zealand shippers, with members across all sectors including ports, freight forwarders, road and rail. In 2010, the New Zealand Shippers’ Council released its report ‘The question of bigger ships: securing New Zealand’s international supply chain’. The report indicated New Zealand exporters would save around $338 million a year as a result of a New Zealand port becoming capable of handling big ships.


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