Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


July marks final countdown for cattle in NAIT transition

July marks final countdown for cattle in NAIT transition

Farmers have one year left to make sure all cattle are tagged and registered with NAIT.

“We are entering the final 12 months of NAIT’s three-year transition for cattle. By 1 July 2015, all stock should be tagged and registered in the NAIT database,” said Dan Schofield, Acting NAIT and Farm Operations Manager.

This includes cattle that were born before the NAIT scheme became mandatory on 1 July 2012. Cattle born since July 2012 must be tagged within six months of birth, or before they are moved off farm, whichever comes first.

“However, we recommend farmers tag animals at the earliest possible time after birth. This means they will be far easier to handle. For best tag retention animals should be tagged in the inner part of the ear between the two veins,” said Mr Schofield.

“Farmers are reminded to tag their stock and register them with NAIT within one week of tagging, or before they leave the property, whichever is soonest.”

Registration is a key requirement of the NAIT scheme. It links the tag used to an animal’s birth farm and also shows the current location of the tagged animal. Performing the animal registration allows that animal to be eligible for lifetime traceability within the NAIT system.

“If farmers have any stock born before 1 July 2012 that they consider too dangerous to tag we recommend sending these animals to slaughter before 1 July 2015. These animals must already have a TBfree New Zealand bar-coded primary ear tag to be eligible and the impractical to tag levy will apply,” said Mr Schofield.

NAIT is beginning a consultation process for the review of the impractical to tag levy as it is currently expected to cease from 1 July 2015.

In the event of a disease outbreak or biosecurity incursion, NAIT data will help New Zealand manage its response, so farmers can get back to business sooner.

By keeping their NAIT records up to date farmers are playing their part in:

• Protecting farmers’ income

• Safeguarding our livestock industry

• Enhancing our reputation for producing safe, high quality products

• Enabling a fast response to animal disease outbreaks

• Maintaining access to global markets

For more information, visit www.nait.co.nz or call 0800 624 843

-ends-


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Fisheries: Report On Underrsize Snapper Catch

The report found that commercial fishers caught 144 tonnes of undersized snapper in the Snapper 1 area – about 3% of the total commercial catch – in the year ending February 2015. The area stretches from the top of the North Island to the Bay of Plenty and is one of New Zealand’s most important fisheries. More>>

ALSO:

Tourism: China Southern Airlines To Fly To Christchurch

China Southern Airlines, in partnership with Christchurch Airport and the South Island tourism industry, has announced today it will begin flying directly between Guangzhou, Mainland China and the South Island. More>>

ALSO:

Dodgy: Truck Shops Come Under Scrutiny

Mobile traders, or truck shops, target poorer communities, particularly in Auckland, with non-compliant contracts, steep prices and often lower-quality goods than can be bought at ordinary shops, a Commerce Commission investigation has found. More>>

ALSO:

Auckland Transport: Government, Council Agree On Funding Approach

The government and Auckland Council have reached a detente over transport funding, establishing a one-year, collaborative timetable for decisions on funding for the city's transport infrastructure growth in the next 30 years after the government refused to fund the $2 billion of short and medium-term plans outlined in Auckland's draft Unitary Plan. More>>

ALSO:

Bullish On China Shock: Slumping Equities, Commodities May Continue, But Not A GFC

The biggest selloff in stock markets in at least four years, slumping commodity prices and a surge in Wall Street's fear gauge don't mean the world economy is heading for another global financial crisis, fund managers say. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news