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Budget-Beating Suzuki Alto is a Thrifty Running Cost Champ

Press Release No: PRESS/AM14/07
Scheduled Release: 25 July 2014

Budget-Beating Suzuki Alto is a Thrifty Running Cost Champion


The thrifty 5-door Suzuki Alto hatchback has again proved a winner when it comes to low running costs.

In the latest independent surveys by Australian motoring organisations, the Alto is named the cheapest car to run in Australia.

The annual surveys showed running costs varied from state to state, but the South Australian Royal Automobile Association (RAA), Tasmania’s Royal Automobile Club of Tasmania (RACT) and the Royal Automobile Club Queensland (RACQ) all agreed it was the least expensive car to operate.

The weekly running costs for an Alto in Tasmania was the equivalent of $115.30 in New Zealand currency, $122.52 in South Australia and $129.67 in Queensland. Among the models beaten by the Alto were the Holden Barina Spark, Mitsubishi Mirage and Fiat 500.

Suzuki’s reputation for producing highly economical cars was also enhanced by the popular Swift which was tops in the light car class in Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia. It also rated highly in Tasmania with a weekly running cost equivalent to $127.24.

Calculated figures included servicing and all other running costs, in addition to fuel. The Alto has been a long-time favourite when it comes to low operating costs.

In a survey of more than 1200 models, the National Roads and Motorists Association (NRMA) in Australia named the Alto the least expensive car to own and operate in 2011 and confirmed it offered the best value for money. Two years later the RACQ announced the compact Suzuki was the cheapest car to run in the first five years of ownership.

Right from introduction the seventh generation Alto has been a fuel economy champion. It was the most economical petrol car in the Automobile Association Energywise Rally in 2010, averaging 4.46 litres/100 km (63.3 miles per gallon) over a 1,783 kilometre run over North Island roads. At the same time the Suzuki also produced the lowest emissions.

In what was not an economy drive, an Alto also averaged 4.4 litres/100 km in an independent 3,400 kilometre return journey at typical average speeds from Auckland to Invercargill.

With improvements to its highly reliable all aluminium 3-cylinder engine and a specification upgrade, the Alto has become even better value for money. The 996 cc motor runs on a high compression ratio and has twin variable intake and exhaust valve timing (VVT).

Despite a budget-beating recommended retail price of $14,990, plus on road costs, the well equipped Alto GLX comes as standard with alloy wheels, front fog lamps, air conditioning, front door electrically operated windows, six speaker audio system and remote control centralised door locking. The Alto is also available with a four-stage automatic transmission for $16,990, plus on road costs. And until the end of August the model is available with 0% interest finance with 1/3 deposit and 2 years to pay.

...ends...


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