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Warren Moyes standing down as Chairman of Northpower

Warren Moyes is standing down as Chairman of Northpower Limited.

Northpower’s Board of Directors will elect his replacement in late July.

Mr Moyes has held the role for 21 years and says he is leaving the company in the best shape of its 94 year history. Northpower’s asset value was just $52 million in 1991 and is now $423 million.

Mr Moyes was appointed Deputy Chairman in 1990 and elected Chairperson in 1993.

Under his guidance Northpower has expanded from a locally owned Northland electricity lines company to a multi-national operator with a presence in Australia and the Pacific Islands.

Northpower is now globally recognised for its expertise in building ultra-fast broadband fibre networks and as a leader in health and safety. It is also one of New Zealand’s largest multi-utility contractors.

Mr Moyes says leading Northpower for such a long tenure has been a privilege.

“It has been extremely rewarding growing with the company,” says Mr Moyes.

“The people at Northpower have achieved so much and they should be immensely proud. They have followed a solid strategic roadmap with backing from the Northpower Electric Power Trust.

“When people said we couldn’t do certain things we proved them wrong – time and again. In the early days our staffing level was in the low hundreds and now it is over 1200 so I am very excited about the future possibilities and on-going growth for Northpower.”

NEPT Chairman Erc Angelo says the impact Mr Moyes has had on Northpower is immense.

“The culture created and the industry respect Northpower has gained through the leadership and ability of Warren deserves to be acknowledged,” says Mr Angelo.

“What a wonderful way to leave Northpower – at an all-time high. I have no doubt

that future initiatives Warren becomes involved in will be all the better for his input and guidance.”

Northpower Chief Executive Mark Gatland says he could not have wished for a better Chairman.

“Warren has always maintained a strategic approach, allowed the business to grow and allowed people to take ownership of their own actions,” says Mr Gatland.

“He has always been absolute on integrity, doing right by people, being open, honest and up-front. And he has always been absolute in his belief that business success is delivered through people and by ensuring customers have nothing to complain about.”

ENDS

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