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Slingshot opens up Global Content

4 July, 2014

Slingshot opens up Global Content

Slingshot has today unshackled many of the world’s leading video streaming sites.

Services such as Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime and BBC iPlayer will now be able to be accessed by all Slingshot customers.

These services geographically restrict which countries can access them. But today the country’s third largest Broadband provider has turned on its Global Mode for all customers – ensuring access to the world’s best content.

Slingshot GM Taryn Hamilton says the ISP believes the time has come for New Zealanders to have the same choice of content that those in America and Europe have.

“We know Kiwis want to watch movies and TV series online – but are blocked from using the world’s best and most popular streaming services. We are now giving Kiwis access to these sites – and an option to pay for the content they want to watch at a fair price.”

Hamilton says many Kiwis are frustrated with a poor selection of content at a significantly higher cost than those in other countries are offered, and for no good reason.

“Either that or they are choosing to pirate the content they want to watch. So giving access to all the great streaming services will give Kiwis much greater choice and an option to pay for content they otherwise may not have been able to.

“The limited access New Zealanders have to content that is widely available overseas is an issue that needs to be addressed.

“There is no valid argument as to why New Zealanders are paying much more for the same content as others in the world. We shouldn’t tolerate it. This issue extends far beyond TV and Movies, with Kiwis paying significantly more for many technology services and products from the world’s biggest brands than in many other countries.”

Smart Kiwi consumers have already turned to online shopping in a bid to get goods at a fair price.

“People know they can go online, and save $100 on a pair of Nikes. It's just smart shopping. This is the same, but for content."

Studies show that many Kiwis are pirating content. A recent survey by Horizon Research showed that more than one fifth of the 2700 respondents had downloaded content illegally.

“We know that people would prefer to pay a reasonable price for the content they want to watch rather than pirating it. It’s time the content providers and rights holders got their act together and offered Kiwis the same content – for the same price – that people in other parts of the world have access to.

“Until they do, people will need to use a service like Global Mode to pay for top-quality online content, or continue to steal it."

Global Mode

The service is included by default and for free.

Customers do not need to do anything other than type the website they want to access in their browser as normal.

Content sites now accessible include Amazon Prime, Hulu, Netflix US and BBC iPlayer.

New Zealand based websites will not be impacted. For example content sites like TVNZ on Demand will continue to work as normal.

Slingshot is proudly 100% Kiwi owned and operated, and is the third largest ISP in New Zealand. Slingshot has deployed the largest Unbundled Local Loop network in New Zealand, having built access to over 150 exchanges throughout New Zealand. Slingshot is focused on delivering a great Kiwi service and creating local jobs with all staff, including the Contact Centre, based in New Zealand.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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