Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


FMA: NZ’s first licence for peer-to-peer lending services

8 July 2014

FMA issues New Zealand’s first licence for peer-to-peer lending services

The Financial Markets Authority (FMA) today issued its first peer-to-peer lending service licence. Auckland-based Harmoney is the first provider of this new financial service, under the provisions of the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013.

“This is a new service for New Zealand that brings new opportunities for lenders and borrowers. Peer-to-peer lending has already proved popular in Europe and US, and we’ve been able to build on that experience,” said Elaine Campbell, FMA’s Director of Compliance.

Licensing peer-to-peer lending services forms part of FMA’s brief to facilitate new capital-raising opportunities in New Zealand. It is also part of the Government’s business growth agenda.

“FMA’s role is to regulate the companies providing peer-to-peer lending services. The service has great potential but lenders should also realise the risks are greater than putting money in a bank. Lenders can lose money or not get the interest they expect if borrowers fail to repay the loans.”

Peer-to-peer lending involves an intermediary, the peer-to-peer lending service, bringing borrowers and lenders together, and charging a fee for the service. Lenders and borrowers can find out more information on FMA’s website.

“To meet the required standards, service providers must provide clear disclosure for lenders and have fair, orderly and transparent processes around how they deliver their service. Applicants must also demonstrate they’ll meet minimum standards of conduct. We are available during the process to help potential licensees understand their obligations,” said Ms Campbell.

“Harmoney has shown itself capable of delivering the service and demonstrated how it intends to comply with its obligations as a licensee.”

Under the regulations, borrowers are limited to raising no more than $2 million in any 12-month period through peer-to-peer lending services. This limit applies to both business and consumer borrowers – although individual service providers may impose lower limits on the amount that may be borrowed. The regulations don’t impose any limits on the amount lenders can lend, although some service providers may impose limits. Lenders should remember they may not be able to withdraw their money at short notice.

FMA’s role involves both licensing peer-to-peer lending services and monitoring their ongoing compliance with their legal obligations and licence conditions.

Borrowers using the service will not be individually checked by FMA, but the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 prohibits borrowers from making false or misleading statements, or unsubstantiated claims. Peer-to-peer lending services must exclude borrowers from using the service if they have reason to believe the borrower is in breach of these obligations.

The peer-to-peer lending service must be a member of a dispute resolution scheme – which customers can use at no cost – and must also have a complaints handling process.

Tips for lenders and borrowers – a Guide to Peer-to-Peer lending
How to apply for a peer-to-peer licence

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Scoop Business: RBNZ Keeps OCR At 3.5%, Signals Slower Pace Of Future Hikes

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 3.5 percent and signalled he won’t be as aggressive with future rate hikes as previously thought as inflation remains tamer than expected. The kiwi dollar fell to a seven-month low. More>>

ALSO:

Weather: Dry Spells Take Hold In South Island

Many areas in the South Island are tracking towards record dry spells as relatively warm, dry weather that began in mid-August continues... for some South Island places, the current period of fine weather is quite rare. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Productivity Commission To Look At Housing Land Supply

The Productivity Commission is to expand on its housing affordability report with an investigation into improving land supply and development capacity, particularly in areas with strong population growth. More>>

ALSO:

Forestry: Man Charged After 2013 Death

Levin Police have arrested and charged a man with manslaughter in relation to the death of Lincoln Kidd who was killed during a tree felling operation on 19 December 2013. More>>

ALSO:

Smells Like Justice: Dairy Company Fined Over Odour

Dairy company fined over odour Dairy supply company Open Country Dairy Limited has been convicted and fined more than $35,000 for discharging objectionable odour from its Waharoa factory at the time of last year’s ”spring flush” when milk supply was high. More>>

Scoop Business: Dairy Product Prices Decline To Lowest Since July 2012

Dairy product prices dropped to the lowest level since July 2012 in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, led by a slump in rennet casein and butter milk powder. More>>

ALSO:

SOE Results: TVNZ Lifts Annual Profit 25% On Flat Ad Revenue, Quits Igloo

Television New Zealand, the state-owned broadcaster, lifted annual profit 25 percent, ahead of forecast and despite a dip in advertising revenue, while quitting its stake in the pay-TV Igloo joint venture with Sky Network Television. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news