Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Professional Foresters Award Their Achievers

Professional Foresters Award Their Achievers


Leaders in the forestry industry were recognised at the New Zealand Institute of Forestry’s annual awards dinner held in Napier last night.

Forester of the Year was awarded to Paul Nicholls, managing director of Rayonier NZ,for outstanding service to the forestry industry.

The award is one of the highest accolades in the industry, recognising contribution, leadership, excellence and integrity.

After obtaining a forestry degree from the University of Canberra, Australia, Paul began as a graduate forester in Tasmania. During his more than 30 years in forestry across Australia and New Zealand Paul has generously given his time and expertise to the benefit of the industry.

These organisations and projects include governance roles with NZ Wood, Wood Council of NZ, The Levy Trust Board, Independent Safety Review Panel and he is currently President of the Forest Owners AssociationFor the past 21 years Paul has been with Rayonier NZ, which manages Rayonier Matariki Forests and is the country’s third largest forest owner.

In announcing the award, President James Treadwell stated, “Paul is one of New Zealand’s most experienced foresters and has contributed greatly to the ongoing growth and success of the industry. His knowledge and passion is highly respected and he is a very committed member of the Institute.”

The Thomas Kirk award which is made every second year was awarded to Dr Andrew McEwen for eminence and recognises outstanding contributions in the field of forestry.

Dr McEwen started as a forest trainee in 1962. From 1971 to 1982 he worked at the Forest Research Institute in Rotorua, during which time he undertook his Ph.D. In 1982 he moved to Wellington, and from 1987 to 1999 he worked for Crown Forestry Management Ltd.

At the end of 1999 he started his own business. Over the last decade Andrew has volunteered countless hours to the industry in his role as President of the Institute over the last six years and Vice President for four years.

President James Treadwell stated, “I am reliably told Andrew entered into the forestry industry as he was told at a careers evening it was an industry where “every day was a picnic in the bush. I do not think any of us believe Andrew has had time for picnics in the last decade!”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news