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C’mon Kiwis – bring in your unwanted phones!

C’mon Kiwis – bring in your unwanted phones!


Vodafone is encouraging Kiwis to gather their unwanted phones and bring them to a Vodafone store for recycling– now the Government has given a green tick to the industry’s mobile recycling scheme.

Vodafone is delighted with today’s announcement from Minister for the Environment, Amy Adams, to approve the New Zealand Telecommunications Carriers Forum (TCF) mobile recycling programme as an accredited Product Stewardship Scheme.

Vodafone Head of Sustainability, Abbie Reynolds, says the government endorsement of the programme – known as Re:MOBILE – is a great win for the industry and environment.

“Vodafone is committed to reducing waste in the environment – that’s why we have been an active and enthusiastic voice in the process of seeking government accreditation.”

Research released today shows that 93% of New Zealanders have owned one or more mobiles in the last five years – an average of 2.4 mobiles per person. Most Kiwis (81%) weren’t sure if their current mobile phone provider ran a mobile phone recycling programme.

“We know there are many people out there with phones lying around in their drawers and closets who just don’t know what to do with them. And Vodafone offers a range of choices for the eco-conscious consumer.

“We have recycling bins in our stores around the country allowing people to swing by and drop-off their unwanted mobiles with ease.

“Alternatively, consumers may be able to trade-in their phone with us and get an in-store credit voucher to the value of their mobile. Those mobiles that do not qualify for a Trade-In value can still be recycled through Re:MOBILE.”

“Trade-in is a great way to do the green thing because all traded-in mobiles are recycled,” Abbie continues. “Even if your mobile isn’t in full working order, you may still be able to get a voucher for a reduced amount.”

Those looking for a new handset can use Vodafone’s eco-rating service. Every mobile sold by Vodafone gets an eco-rating, indicating its impact on the environment and society. This service relies on analysing information on more than 150 different items to arrive at the 0-5 rating.

A percentage of the profits from the programme go to the Starship Foundation to support Starship National and the National Air Ambulance.

For more information, please visit http://www.vodafone.co.nz/environment/mobile-recycling/ENDS


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