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Countdown drops price of bread to $1 a loaf

Countdown drops price of bread to $1 a loaf

Price of Homebrand bread range drops to $1
Expected to save shoppers more than $7 million per year on bread
Better value for customers on more than 430 products since October

17 July 2014 - Countdown has dropped the everyday price of its Homebrand bread range to $1. From tomorrow (Friday, 18 July), these products join more than 430 other grocery items with a new everyday low price.

Countdown Managing Director, Dave Chambers, says bread is a staple of almost every household and each year New Zealanders buy 15 million loaves of Homebrand white and wheatmeal bread from their stores.

“Price is important to Kiwis, no matter who they are or where they live. We can’t impact the cost of our customers’ rent, mortgage or their power bill, but we have listened to what our customers want and can help families manage the cost of their shopping by delivering better value every day, like a loaf of bread,” says Chambers.

“At Countdown we’re committed to lowering prices for longer. When prices are cut, competition increases and that’s good for shoppers. We’re saying to New Zealanders that they can count on us to be even more competitive than we have been.”

The price of Homebrand white and wheatmeal loaves will drop from $1.48 to $1 and based on the number of loaves sold last year, it’s anticipated that customers will save $7.3 million a year from this price reduction, bringing them everyday better value on bread.

Cutting the price of Homebrand bread is part of Countdown’s Price Lockdown and Price Drop programme that launched in October 2013. Since then the everyday price of more than 430 grocery items has dropped, such as fresh chicken, ham and coleslaw, frozen vegetables, pet food, biscuits, toothpaste and toilet paper. In May, Countdown dropped the price on a range of other bakery goods such as mega-pack rolls, pita bread and tortillas.

“Kiwis have made use of the better value of Price Lockdown and Price Drop and have already saved $16 million on these products since last October. We’re always looking for new opportunities to deliver savings for our customers. Our $1 bread is an example of our commitment to bringing lower prices to Kiwis for longer,” says Chambers.

• Cutting the cost of Homebrand bread from $1.48 to just $1 a loaf.
• Countdown sells 15 million loaves of Homebrand bread per year.
• Price cut estimated to save customers over $50 a year on Homebrand bread on average.
• Since October last year Countdown has dropped the price of more than 430 items, already saving customers $16 million across Price Lockdown and Price Drop products.
• Freya’s Bread is new to the Price Lockdown range: two loaves (excl Low Carb) for $6 or $3.50 each, usually $4.79 ea, estimated to save customers $3.5 million a year on Freya’s.
• There is a limit of four Homebrand bread loaves per customer in stores. The Homebrand bread range includes: White Toast, White Sandwich, Wheatmeal Toast, Wheatmeal Sandwich.

About Countdown
Countdown is one of New Zealand’s largest employers with more than 18,000 team members across 171 supermarkets, distribution centres, processing plants and support offices. We serve 2.7 million customers every week, and work with more than 1100 food producers and suppliers throughout New Zealand, as well as thousands of independent farmers and growers. We’re committed to being part of the communities we live and work in: some of our activities include the Countdown Kids Hospital Appeal, which has raised more than $6.9 million in the past seven years for children’s hospital wards, and Countdown Food Rescue which donates more than $1.4 million of food each year to The Salvation Army and other food banks charity partners, so we can help Kiwis in need.
www.countdown.co.nz

ENDS

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