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Has NZ become a nation of lazy jobseekers?

“Find Me” isn’t cutting it - has NZ become a nation of lazy jobseekers?

If you expect your ideal employer to knock on your door you’re not alone. New research shows almost half of all New Zealanders are open to a new job but not actively looking for it, yet according to recruiting experts Hays if you want to secure your next job you need to be proactive and apply.

“Social media has given professionals an opportunity to share their profile online with a global audience,” says Jason Walker, Managing Director of Hays in New Zealand. “But that doesn’t mean hiring employers will always search you out. While we’ve all heard of colleagues or friends who have been contacted by a potential employer, this is not the norm for the majority of jobs.

“Instead, jobseekers need to be more proactive. If they want a new job, the old rules still apply – update your resume as well as your social media profile, engage a recruiter and apply for suitable opportunities. Be proactive to advance your career,” he said.

Statistics from Trade Me show that while 62% of New Zealanders are open to new opportunities, 49% are not actively looking but are instead passively keeping an eye on the jobs market.

According to Hays, these professionals can take control of their jobs search by:

Identifying the right recruiter: First identify the right recruiter for your role and industry. Look for an expert who recruits for your job function.

Sell yourself: Know your unique selling points and be able to succinctly sell yourself to your recruiter and in interviews.

Update your resume: It doesn't matter how qualified you are, or how much experience you have, if your resume is poorly presented or badly written, you're going to have trouble getting an interview. So update it as well as your online profile, and include examples of how you have contributed to your employer's workplace.

Industry trends: Stay on top of industry trends to demonstrate to employers that as your industry and business moves forward, you are moving forward with it. Join the relevant membership body or LinkedIn group, take professional development classes or volunteer for new duties to keep your technical skills up to date.

ends

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