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Spanners fly in Southland: MTA Fastest Spanner 2014

Media Release 25/7/14

Spanners fly in Southland: MTA Fastest Spanner 2014

Automotive technicians from across Southland battled it out with technique, skill, teamwork and panache for the title of MTA Fastest Spanner: 2014.

Ten two-man teams from the south of the South Island came together to pull apart, then put back together engines to working order the fastest on Thurday night. More than 300 spectators packed the Invercargill Workingmen's Club to watch the event, organised by the MTA Southland Branch.
The winning team, of Tristan Duffell from Prestige Commercial Vehicles, and Bruce Woodd from Macaulay Motors, dismantled, reassembled, then started the 1.3 litre Toyota engine in 12 minutes and five seconds. The winning pair shaved 4 seconds off the previous record time of 12 minutes and 9 seconds, set last year by Duffell and colleague Allen Whitaker.
The engines, prepared specially for the event by Southland Institute of Technology, were commonly found in the ubiquitous Toyota Corolla – which all technicians had experience with. All proceeds raised from ticket sales went to the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

MTA Southland Business Advisor Michelle Findlater said the evening put the talent and technique of automotive technicians on centre stage, and was greatly enjoyed by the competitors and the spectators.

“The top spot is hotly contested – we've had teams returning for four years running, trying to take out the title,” she said.

“This is the fifth year we've held this. Every year, the number of spectators gets bigger, and the times get lower. Overall, it is a great night out for the industry, and really shows the skill level these technicians have.”

MTA Fastest Spanner 2014:

First place:
Tristan Duffell from Prestige Commercial Vehicles, and Bruce Woodd from Macaulay Motors.
(12 mins, 05 seconds)

Second place:
Callum Baird and Daniel Strang, from Southern Automobiles and Komatsu.
(12 mins, 40 seconds)

Third place:
Allen Whitaker and Conner Withington, from Prestige Commercial Vehicles.
(13 minutes 15 seconds)

© Scoop Media

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