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Scent-based speed dating comes to Kiwi shores

Media Release
25 July 2014

Scent-based speed dating comes to Kiwi shores

Single Kiwis were given the chance to find love using only a person’s natural scent, thanks to a ‘Pheromone Party’ held in Auckland last night by Trade Me’s dating website FindSomeone (

Head of FindSomeone, Lou Compagnone, described last night’s party as a huge success. “With online dating we provide you with everything but the spark. But a Pheromone Party is almost the complete opposite, because it starts with pure chemistry.”

American artist Judith Prays invented the Pheromone Party idea, holding the first of its kind in New York in 2010, before promoting the concept across America and the UK.

“The idea is for participants to wear a t-shirt overnight for three nights so it’s well and truly soaked in pheromones, then pop it in a bag and bring it along to the party,” Ms Compagnone said. “From there it’s all about finding a scent you like, and getting acquainted with the t-shirt’s owner.”

Around 100 scent-sniffing participants attended the Pheromone Party in downtown Auckland, with intrigued bloggers and journalists also along for the ride.

“Pheromone-based events have grown in popularity overseas over the last couple of years, and Kiwi daters have been missing out,” Ms Compagnone said. “We’re excited to be involved in something new and quirky to the dating scene and bringing Australasia’s first official Pheromone Party to life.”

She said “sniffing your way to love” is not a silver bullet, but was a bit of fun for daters keen to try something a bit different. “We didn’t necessarily expect love at first scent, but it’s an interesting and out-of-the-box way to break the ice when meeting someone new.”

Ms Compagnone said pheromones were the chemical triggers of sexual attraction in mammals, and determine fecundity. “This means that if you’re attracted to someone’s pheromones, it’s meant to be a pretty good indicator that you two would have healthy offspring. No pressure though, of course.”

FindSomeone plans to hold more Pheromone Parties around the country, including a gay and lesbian event.


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