Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


NZ dollar slips as Key says kiwi over-valued

NZ dollar slips as Key says kiwi over-valued, Fonterra forecast looms

By Jonathan Underhill

July 28 (BusinessDesk) - The New Zealand dollar fell to a month-low after Prime Minister John Key said he agreed with the Reserve Bank that the currency is over-valued and as traders anticipate an announcement from Fonterra Cooperative Group tomorrow which is expected to include a cut to the milk price forecast.

The kiwi fell to 85.31 US cents at 5pm in Wellington, from 85.63 cents at 8am and from 85.51 cents on Friday in New York. The trade-weighted index fell to 79.66 from 79.94 at the New York close.

Economists at ASB expect Fonterra to revise down its milk price payout for the 2014/15 season to about $6.20 per kilogram of milk solids, from its initial estimate of $7/kgMS. Falling prices of dairy products are expected to contribute to a sharp decline in the nation's terms of trade from a 40-year high the bank said. Meantime, Key told his post-Cabinet media conference that he concurred with the central bank that the kiwi was too strong, a view expressed by governor Graeme Wheeler when he raised the official cash rate to 3.5 percent last week while signalling a pause in the tightening cycle.

"The kiwi came off after the RBNZ and it is not bouncing," said Martin Rudings, senior foreign exchange dealer at OMF. "The offshore market is showing it is still a bit long (kiwi). It's likely to go lower in the short term."

Asked if he was comfortable if the Reserve Bank intervened, Key said: "Yes. If they choose to do that they have a mandate under which to intervene."

"I think as a long-term policy tool they (intervention) are not very effective, but they can have a short-term benefit," Key said. "I would agree with the governor that the New Zealand dollar is overvalued if you compared it against a reduction in commodity prices. So you've seen some reduction since he's made those comments."

The US dollar index, a measure of the greenback against a basket of currencies, is at its highest level since early February as traders await offshore news this week including the Federal Open Market Committee meeting, which is expected to continue the move away from extraordinary policy, the first reading of second-quarter US gross domestic product, manufacturing and non-farm payrolls for July.

The local currency traded at 86.88 yen from 87.07 yen on Friday in New York, and edged down to 90.87 Australian cents from 90.99 cents. It traded at 63.55 euro cents from 63.65 cents last week, and was little changed at 50.27 British pence from 50.37 pence.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Strike: Lyttelton Port Workers Vote To Escalate Dispute

Members of the Rail and Maritime Transport Union (RMTU) at Lyttelton Port today voted to escalate their industrial action. Around 200 RMTU members have been operating an overtime ban since 17 December and today they endorsed a series of full withdrawals of labour at the port. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Dollar Falls To 3-Year Low As Investors Favour Greenback

The New Zealand dollar fell to its lowest in more than three years as investors sold euro and bought US dollars, weakening other currencies against the greenback. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Govt Operating Deficit Smaller Than Expected

The New Zealand’s government’s operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first five months of the financial year as a clampdown on expenditure managed to offset a shortfall in the tax-take from last month’s forecast. More>>

ALSO:

0.8 Percent Annually:
NZ Inflation Falls Below RBNZ's Target

New Zealand's annual pace of inflation slowed to below the Reserve Bank's target band in the final three months of the year, giving governor Graeme Wheeler more room to keep the benchmark interest rate lower for longer.More>>

ALSO:

NASA, NOAA: Find 2014 Warmest Year In Modern Record

Since 1880, Earth’s average surface temperature has warmed by about 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit (0.8 degrees Celsius), a trend that is largely driven by the increase in carbon dioxide and other human emissions into the planet’s atmosphere. The majority of that warming has occurred in the past three decades. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: New Zealand’s Reserve Bank Named Central Bank Of The Year

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand’s efforts to stifle house price inflation by using new policy tools has seen the institution named Central Bank of the year by Central Banking Publications, a publisher specialising in global central banking practice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news