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Importing containers now easier for NZ businesses

Importing containers now easier for NZ businesses
Date: 29 July 2014

Importing a few containers of goods into New Zealand each year is now easier than ever before thanks to a new service being offered by biosecurity experts Independent Verification Services (IVS).

The company has been given authority by the Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) to handle all the biosecurity requirements and paperwork that’s required when someone imports low-risk containers into this country.

Independent Verification Services chief executive Peter Webb says businesses would traditionally need to develop their own biosecurity procedures and manuals, have their staff trained by an approved provider, and maintain their status as an approved transitional facility in order to import a container of goods.

“Biosecurity regulations are a complex area and there are a lot of requirements that have to be met,” said Mr Webb.

“For many Kiwi businesses the red-tape involved in importing something is really time consuming and can be very off-putting.”

But now businesses can join IVS’ multi-location transitional facility service and have the entire process managed for them.

“IVS will take care of all the MPI reporting requirements, add the site to our multi-location approval, provide the qualified staff, and deal with any obvious contaminants that may be found,” said Mr Webb.

“We also help explain to each business what’s required for them to meet New Zealand’s biosecurity standards so that we can clear their containers in a fast and cost-effective manner.

“They’ll no longer have to worry about putting together documentation manuals, preparing for MPI audits, or having to train staff and maintain their approved operator and accredited persons certification,” he says.

“Our new service is a much easier, streamlined system that will save people both time and money.”

The MTF service applies to low-risk containers only, meaning they must contain goods which are not a risk in themselves but that may have come into contact with obvious biosecurity contaminants like soil, leaf debris or insects.

“Occasionally these things do make it into the country and they can potentially have consequences for our environment and economy. IVS staff are trained to deal with these situations in a safe and appropriate manner.”

Mr Webb says once businesses have signed up to the IVS multi-location programme and IVS has checked their premises against the programme’s requirements, they can then ring the company 48 hours prior to their container’s arrival to arrange clearance.

Independent Verification Services staff will check the outside of the container first before monitoring the removal of goods, inspecting the empty container and disposing of any contaminants that may be found before giving final sign-off.

“It’s a hassle-free process that will certainly make it easier for New Zealand businesses to import the goods they need without creating an administration headache for themselves or their staff,” said Mr Webb.

ENDS

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