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Music act visa change a boon for tourism

Music act visa change a boon for tourism


New visa regulations will help attract more high-end music acts to New Zealand, offering great spin-offs for the tourism industry, says the Tourism Industry Association New Zealand(TIA).

From the end of November, high-end music acts and their support crew will be able to travel and perform in New Zealand on visitor visas rather than work visas so long as they are being promoted by a local company.

“Cutting the red tape will make it much easier and cheaper for the world’s top performers and their entourages to come to New Zealand,” says TIA Policy & Research Manager Simon Wallace.

Reducing barriers to travel is a key theme in the Tourism 2025 growth framework, which aims to double annual tourism revenue to $41 billion over the next decade.

“It makes New Zealand a much more attractive destination for these big-name acts, which is great news for Kiwi music lovers and for accommodation providers, restaurants, bars, retailers and other attractions which benefit from the business that big concerts generate.”

Sally Attfield, TIA Hotel Sector Manager, says because music events can be held in the shoulder and off-seasons, they can create demand for accommodation and other services at what is typically a quieter time of the year for tourism businesses.

“TIA advocated hard for this change, particularly on behalf of our hotel members. This is an excellent result and shows the economic benefit of tourism and Immigration New Zealand working closely together.”

ends

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