Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Growth in global milk pool 'unusual,' says Spierings

Growth in global milk pool 'unusual,' says Spierings, in cutting forecast

By Jonathan Underhill

July 29 (BusinessDesk) - The global market for dairy products have been in the unusual situation where most producers have been lifting supply, while demand weakened in China, Southeast Asia and the Middle East, says Fonterra Cooperative Group chief executive Theo Spierings.

The world's biggest dairy exporter today cut its Farmgate Milk Price forecast for the 2014/2015 year to $6 a kilogram of milk solids from a previous forecast of $7 kgMS, reflecting a slide in global dairy prices, which touched their lowest levels since December 2012 in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction. It flagged a dividend of 20 cents to 25 cents, up from last year's 10 cent payment.

"All milk pools around the world showed significant growth - we see milk coming from everywhere," Spierings said. "On the demand side, China is looking at pretty high inventories" although in-market sales "are still very, very strong in China." Demand in Southeast Asia and the Middle East had dropped off faster than expected as rising prices were passed onto consumers, he said.

Fonterra doesn't expect to face the same production pressures as it did last season, when it produced milk powder at full capacity to meet demand from China. In the coming season it is possible the company lifts production of other products, he said.

The dollar fell to 85.13 US cents from 85.45 cents ahead of Fonterra's announcement and the trade-weighted index fell to 79.47 from 79.77 as traders and economists mulled the likely impact on the New Zealand economy and interest rates.

"Fonterra farmers’ farm-gate income will be collectively around $3.8 billion down from last year’s stellar season, though with a small offset through the share dividend expected to be higher over the season," ASB Bank chief economist Nick Tuffley said in a note. "The Fonterra update quantifies the impact of the decline in dairy prices seen since the original forecast was made. From an interest rate perspective the RBNZ has been taking into account the drop in GDT dairy prices and the stubbornness of the NZ dollar, with both factors being part of the decision to step to the sidelines."

Elevated dairy prices propelled New Zealand's terms of trade to a 40-year high in the first quarter of this year, providing a major impetus to the nation's growth, though economists say trade has probably peaked given the subsequent decline in prices of milk powder exports.

"Our forecasting anticipates some recovery in global dairy prices but it is too early to predict how strong this recovery will be or when it will kick in," chief executive Spierings said in a statement. “As we continue to drive for growth in our consumer and foodservice businesses, during the first half of the current financial year we expect reduced cost of goods arising from lower dairy commodity prices to have a positive impact on returns."

He said the lift in the dividend estimate was "based on zero ingredients stream returns at this early stage in the season," meaning it could yet be revised higher.

Units in Fonterra Shareholders' Fund, which give investors access to the company's dividends, rose 1.2 percent to $6.07.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Economic Update: RBNZ Says Rate Cut Seems Likely

The Reserve Bank will likely cut interest rates further as a persistently strong kiwi dollar makes it difficult for the bank to meet its inflation target, it said. The local currency fell. More>>

ALSO:

House Price Action Plan: RBNZ Signals National Lending Restrictions

The central bank wants to cap bank lending to property investors with a deposit of less than 40 percent at 5 percent and restore the 10 percent limit for owner-occupiers wanting to take out a mortgage with a deposit of less than 20 percent, according to a consultation paper released today. More>>

ALSO:

Sparks Fly: Gordon Campbell On China Steel Dumping Allegations

No doubt, officials on the China desk at MFAT have prided themselves on fashioning a niche position for New Zealand right in between the US and China – and leveraging off both of them! Well, as the Aussies would say, of MFAT: tell ‘em they’re dreaming. More>>

ALSO:

Loan Sharks: Finance Companies Found Guilty Of Breaching Fair Trading Act

Finance companies Budget Loans and Evolution Finance, run by former 1980s corporate high-flyer Allan Hawkins, have been found guilty of 106 charges of breaching the Fair Trading Act for misleading 21 borrowers while enforcing loan contracts. More>>

ALSO:

Post Panama Papers: Govt To Adopt Shewan's Foreign Trust Recommendations

The government will adopt all of the recommendations from former PwC chairman John Shewan to increase disclosure and introduce a register for foreign trusts with new legislation to be introduced next month. More>>

ALSO:

The Price Of Cheese: Cheddar At Eight-Year Low

Food prices decreased 0.5 percent in the year to June 2016, influenced by lower grocery food prices (down 2.3 percent), Statistics New Zealand said today. Compared with June 2015, cheese prices were down 9.5 percent, fresh milk was down 3.9 percent, and yoghurt was down 9.2 percent. More>>

ALSO:

Financial Advisers: New 'Customer-First' Obligations

Goldsmith plans to do away with the current adviser designations which he says have been "unsatisfactory" in that some advisers are obliged to disclose potential conflicts of interest and act in their customers' best interests, but others are not. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news