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Ant Franklin Appointed as First Ever Infotools CEO

Ant Franklin Appointed as First Ever Infotools CEO

Founding director steps up to take marketing research technology company to next level

In response to an identified business need for clear leadership across the company at a more senior level, Infotools have appointed their first ever CEO, Ant Franklin. Based at their New Zealand headquarters, his focus is to evolve and grow the company and continue positioning it as a world class provider of tools and software for marketing research.

‘Ron Stroeven and I started Infotools in 1990. At Infotools we now have close to 180 people stretched around the world, with operations in four continents, and partnering with some of the largest multinationals as clients,’ says Franklin. ‘We are really excited about the new product developments we are close to releasing and there is huge potential for our innovation pipeline.’

Recent times have seen the company dealing with the challenge of a record-high exchange rate, and an increase in the number of technology companies competing in their space.

Franklin is optimistic about Infotools’ ability to ride the waves of change. ‘We have built a rock-solid team over the years, consisting of some of the best talent in the industry across four continents. With over 20 years of experience behind us and with a determination to keep building our footprint across the global market research space, we are well-positioned to reach the goals we have set for ourselves.’

Jim Mclean, chairman of the Infotools board, adds: ‘It is no secret that the market research industry is an ever-evolving one. The recent appointment of Ant Franklin as CEO is just one of the ways Infotools intends to stay on the cutting edge of marketing research technology services.’

Infotools transform marketing research data into a knowledge bank. Clients then use tools to investigate, visualise and create stories. Infotools is a privately-owned company, operating in over 110 countries and headquartered in New Zealand since 1990.


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