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New app touted as the ‘video- Instagram’ to be piloted in NZ

29 July 2014

New app touted as the ‘video- Instagram’ to be piloted in New Zealand

The social media video app Veeemotion was launched in New Zealand over the weekend.

Users of the UK developers app compare the technology to the likes of Facebook or Instagram, with a powerful social networking and video capturing/editing function.

The Veeemotion developers chose to promote the app in New Zealand first as they recognised Kiwi’s reputation for being early adaptors of such technology and New Zealand’s size makes it an ideal testing ground.

The app is designed for those without technical video know-how, who want to easily create and share professional quality videos.

The social networking component of the app allows users to share and store videos either publically or privately on their own select network.

The app boasts:
• Multiple editing tools. These include: trimming and cutting, inserting video from your camera roll or other sources, special effects (e.g. slow motion and filters), captions (choose colour and font), titles and music.
• Multi-Filter capture features. The patent pending technology allows three versions to be filmed at the same time– unfiltered and filtered. Filters can also be added in after.
• Sharing functions to Twitter, Facebook, google+, Pinterest and LinkedIn and also via SMS or email.
• Showcase. The app enables the user to create a multi- channel home for their videos.
• Unique privacy settings that do not allow the recipient of a shared video to “share on” private material unless given permission by the creator.

The Veeemotion app offers a solution for those who want to create and share their videos, aspiring young home video makers who want to share their work, families wanting to document their memories safely, and businesses wanting to create high quality content for their websites.

[Click here] to preview a video created using Veeemotion
The Veeemotion app can be downloaded from the Apple Store and is available on all iPhone and tablet devices.


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