Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


NZ renters are not more vulnerable

NZ renters are not more vulnerable

Auckland, NZ, 31st July 2014

The Auckland Property Investors’ Association (APIA) rejects characterisation by the New Zealand Institute Of Economic Research (NZIER) of New Zealand being ‘one of the least renter-friendly regimes in the OECD’.

‘The NZIER takes an euro-centric view of residential tenancy which simply bears no cultural reference to the ordinary Kiwi renters.’ says Andrew Bruce, President of APIA.

By alleging that renters are denied the security of long term tenancies, the NZIER grossly underplays the attraction of transitionary tenures. ‘Yes, tenants renting executive-style properties usually are after longer fixed-term agreements. However, for your run-of-the-mill renting, tenants like to be able to move more quickly in response to job opportunities and changing personal circumstances. It is out of touch to suggest that tenants do not value this type of flexibility.'

The NZIER claims that the short notice requirement in this country makes it too easy for landlords to terminate tenancies. ‘That is incorrect,’ says Bruce, ‘The Residential Tenancies Act requires landlords to give 90 days notice to terminate in most instances, while tenants only need to give 21 days notice. To me that put tenants in a more flexible, and powerful, position than their landlords.’

Although renters need landlord consent to make minor property customisations, the Residential Tenancies Act forbids that consent to be unreasonably withheld. In pointing out that some European countries make it easier for renters to alter their homes, the NZIER has failed to understand that rental properties are supplied on a different basis in New Zealand. Bruce explains, ’You are simply not comparing apples with apples. The reason why minor alterations are the norm in some European countries is because many rental properties do not come with carpets or kitchen units. That is not the case here. With proper communication, you will find that most NZ landlords are amenable to work being done on the property if it means keeping a good tenant on the property for longer.‘

While the APIA continues to welcome productive conversations with the tenant community on ways landlords can provide even better accommodation services, it rejects any suggestions that NZ renters are vulnerable and disadvantaged.

Auckland Property Investors’ Association

Auckland, New Zealand -


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news