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New President, Councillors for InternetNZ

New President, Councillors for InternetNZ

InternetNZ is pleased to welcome Jamie Baddeley as its new President. The Internet authority recently held a by-election to replace outgoing President Frank March who is standing down after five years in the role.

The by-election was held in conjunction with the annual election of Councillors, which saw Sarah Lee and Hayden Glass elected as new Council members, and returned Rochelle Furneaux and David Moskovitz for a further term.

InternetNZ Chief Executive Jordan Carter said he is looking forward to working with Jamie as the organisation continues the great work already underway from Frank's time in the role.

“While Frank was president, InternetNZ began NetHui in 2011, we’ve been instrumental in helping the Government with Internet related policy, we provide community funding through grants and strategic partnerships, and we’ve now just rebranded and reoriented ourselves to focus more on people’s experience online.

"Already Jamie has expressed a desire to keep that focus going so I know we’ll work well together,” says Mr Carter.

The President of InternetNZ leads the twelve-member elected Council in maintaining the effective governance of the organisation. InternetNZ is a helping hand, a guide and a voice for the Internet and its users in New Zealand with a vision of a better world through a better Internet.

Jamie Baddeley says he is excited to keep that work going.

“The staff at InternetNZ has been doing amazing work with New Zealand’s Internet community. That will make my role very easy and I look forward to over-seeing more of the same,” said Mr Baddeley.

Jamie Baddeley is a telecommunications and Internet industry veteran having started in the sector in the very early 90's. Mr Baddeley has been actively involved in InternetNZ since 2006, and for the last 5 years has served as Vice-President of the organisation. His background also includes time as President of the ISP Association of NZ, and as a trustee of the New Zealand Network Operators Group, and with companies that have built and run national telecommunications backbones, Internet peering exchanges and broadband solutions for rural and provincial communities.


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