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Wellington’s Lag as New Zealand’s Capital City Woeful

Wellington’s Lag as New Zealand’s Capital City Woeful

Property Council Wellington is extremely concerned with the decision to axe the Basin Reserve Project.

An independent Board of Inquiry has declined resource consent for the New Zealand Transport Agency’s (NZTA’s) $90 million flyover project which is a huge step back for the city.

Property Council agrees with Greater Wellington Regional Council, Wellington City Council and the NZTA that north-south traffic must be separated from east-west traffic in the area.

The other important aspect of this project is its integral role in the Wellington Northern Corridor project.

This project provides desperately needed infrastructure from Wellington Airport to 10 kilometres north of Levin.

The Northern Corridor brings significant benefits to Wellington:
• 8,000 construction jobs to build the corridor and 865 extra permanent roles in the region
• 30 per cent fewer serious crashes in the five years after the route is completed (2,800 over five years throughout Porirua, Kapiti and Wellington: NZTA statistics 2008 - 2012)
• Save 40 minutes journey-time between Wellington Airport and Levin by 2031
• Provide up to 31 kilometres of new walking and cycling facilities

Wellington Branch president Andrew Hay says the decision is a significant setback for a key section of transport infrastructure.

“The flow-on effect of retaining the state highway course through the high pedestrian area of Te Aro will hinder intensification and growth in residential population in the area that is otherwise ideally suited to such a growing use.”

With a projected population increase of 80,000 largely in Kapiti and Wellington central over the next 20 years, mistakes today could prove irreversible for the Capital City in the future.

Wellington has arrived at a crossroads to determine its level of progress and commercial viability but it must shed bureaucratic delays and the Not In My Backyard mentality.

ENDS

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