Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Christchurch City to mop up remaining shares in Lyttelton

Christchurch City seeks to mop up remaining shares in Lyttelton Port

Aug. 1 (BusinessDesk) - Christchurch City Holdings, the city's infrastructure investment arm, says it will offer to buy the 20 percent of Lyttelton Port Co it doesn't already own and has a lock-up agreement for Port Otago's 15.5 percent holding. The shares soared on the news.

CCH already owns 79.6 percent of the port company and with Port Otago's holding it will comfortably be above the 90 percent threshold to compulsorily acquire the rest of the shares. It will offer $3.95 a share for remaining stock in the port company, higher than the stock has ever traded and valuing the business at about $404 million. In addition, Lyttlelton Port would also pay a special dividend of 20 cents to existing shareholders, using any imputation credits to pay the tax. The shares jumped 24 percent to $4.10 on the news

“This acquisition will enable CCH to have greater flexibility in its relationship with LPC” said Bob Lineham, the investment company's chief executive.

A formal takeover offer is likely to be made next week, the company said. On completion the port company would be delisted.

The transaction comes on the same day that the city council released a report from investment bank Cameron Partners identified a $400 million gap in Christchurch's ability to pay its share of the earthquake rebuild. That's on top of an already identified $440 million funding shortfall in a report by accounting firm Korda Mentha.

The city is contemplating the sale of a strategic stake inits investment company, which controls the city's port, airport and electricity network to help close the gap.

Mayor Lianne Dalziel argues the city would gain strategic advantage from bringing on new investors to CCH. A funding shortfall above $800 million could threaten the city's A+ credit rating from Standard & Poor's and may breach its financial obligations under local government finance legislation.

CCH owns 89.3 percent of Orion, the city's electricity network, 75 percent of Christchurch International Airport, as well as the port stake, and businesses including the Red Bus company, City Care, Enable Services and Ecocentral.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news