Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Massive Progress on DC Legislation

Massive Progress on DC Legislation


Property Council is delighted with the Government’s progress on changing the way development contributions are charged.

Parliament has concluded its third reading of the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 3), which sets out key reforms to DCs legislation and the regime.

The bill will most likely become law this week.

This is a massive leap forward, and Property Council congratulates the Government in setting out a framework for fairer, and more transparent development contribution charges.

Property Council chief executive, Connal Townsend says no doubt there will still be challenges as legislation can often be limited.

“It will still come down to councils to ensure they comply with the new rules, in particular the principles provisions, which set out the basis for imposing any charges.”

“We will continue to work with Central Government and local councils to ensure the legislation is interpreted correctly and results in more equitable charging arrangements going forward.”

National guidance and strong leadership in the objections process is key to progress in this respect.

Important changes under the legislation include:

Introducing a new purpose and principles provisions setting out the basis for development contribution charges

Clarifying and narrowing the range of infrastructure that can be financed by development contributions

Improving the transparency of territorial authorities policies, including requiring reporting on projects being funded by development contributions

Encouraging greater private provision of infrastructure through the use of development agreements

Restrictions on requiring development contributions for reserves

Introducing an objections process, where decisions are made by independent decision makers

END.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Housing: Affordability Drops 14%, Driven By Auckland Prices

Housing affordability across New Zealand fell 14 percent in the year ending November 2014, with Auckland’s lack of affordability set to reach levels it hit during the height of the global financial crisis, according to the latest Massey University Home Affordability Report More>>

ALSO:

The Dry: Fonterra Drops Forecast Milk Volumes By 3.3 Percent

Fonterra Cooperative Group, the worlds largest dairy exporter, reduced its milk volume forecast for the 2014-2015 season by 3.3 per cent due to the impact of dry weather on production in recent weeks. More>>

ALSO:

Strike: Lyttelton Port Workers Vote To Escalate Dispute

Members of the Rail and Maritime Transport Union (RMTU) at Lyttelton Port today voted to escalate their industrial action. Around 200 RMTU members have been operating an overtime ban since 17 December and today they endorsed a series of full withdrawals of labour at the port. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Dollar Falls To 3-Year Low As Investors Favour Greenback

The New Zealand dollar fell to its lowest in more than three years as investors sold euro and bought US dollars, weakening other currencies against the greenback. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Govt Operating Deficit Smaller Than Expected

The New Zealand’s government’s operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first five months of the financial year as a clampdown on expenditure managed to offset a shortfall in the tax-take from last month’s forecast. More>>

ALSO:

0.8 Percent Annually:
NZ Inflation Falls Below RBNZ's Target

New Zealand's annual pace of inflation slowed to below the Reserve Bank's target band in the final three months of the year, giving governor Graeme Wheeler more room to keep the benchmark interest rate lower for longer.More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news