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Casio G-Shock releases Gravity Master series

Casio G-Shock releases Gravity Master series – the world’s first hybrid time-keeping system

Casio is excited to introduce the G-SHOCK GPW-1000 watch, marking the development and incorporation of the world’s first hybrid time keeping system that receives both Global Positioning System (GPS) signals and radio wave time-calibration signals transmitted from six stations worldwide. The GPW-1000 is part of the G-Shock GRAVITYMASTER collection, which has a long standing association with the Royal Air Force.

The GPW-1000 watch was developed to realize the ultimate in toughness through refinements in accuracy and durability drawing on Casio technology. The watch offers unsurpassed toughness combined with the world’s first hybrid time keeping system. From dense forest to desert dunes, in marine environments or surrounded by buildings or indoors, the GPW-1000 keeps accurate time anywhere in the world by receiving GPS signals and radio wave time-calibration signals transmitted from six stations worldwide.

Global Positioning System + Multi Band 6 radio signal reception capability
GRAVITYMASTER is equipped both to receive time-calibration signals by radio wave from any of the six transmission stations worldwide for use in precision time correction and to receive transmissions of position and time data from GPS satellites. It integrates the applications of two types of timepiece — a radio-controlled watch capable of more reliable signal reception and a GPS watch with wider-area coverage —to ensure time-keeping accuracy beyond the limits of conventional watches.

Original GPS algorithm providing faster, more accurate positioning information
When it receives positioning data from a GPS satellite, the system employs high-resolution map data to determine the user’s current location more precisely. Application of a variable data analysis technique to group regions with the same Summer Time setting in the same time zone enables it to make quick, accurate time difference adjustments.

New evolutionary advances in time telling
When the watch receives transmissions from a GPS satellite, the second hand indicates the current time and appropriate city name, while the small hand in the 3 o’clock position displays the latitude at the current location. A next-generation solar-powered, radio-controlled watch with full functionality in any region or time zone, the new GPS HYBRID WAVE CEPTOR has evolved uniquely in terms of both time telling and data presentation.

The watch uses ultra-small motors for the hand drive mechanism, to secure the space to mount the hybrid time keeping system. To compensate for increased power consumption, the Casio G-SHOCK GPW-1000 features a new low-power consumption, high-performance GPS LSI, as well as a new shape of solar cell with high-efficiency output. Other features include a ceramic GPS antenna and fine resin case for high signal sensitivity and shock resistance.

The Triple G Resist construction features a reinforced construction to resist shocks, centrifugal force, and vibrations. A high strength and durability carbon fibre insert band, and bezel with scratch-resistant DLC coating ensure a level of toughness to withstand the harshest of environments.

The first G-SHOCK was born in 1983 out of an engineer’s passion for creating an “unbreakable watch,” challenging the common notion of the wristwatch. Since then, the G-SHOCK series has continued to evolve over time by incorporating advanced technology and capturing trends based on a platform of toughness, to offer features, performance, and design that surpass the imagination of users.

Visit for more info and stockist details.

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