Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Where Road Cones Go To Die

Where Road Cones Go To Die

by Simon Wilkinson
August 8, 2014

New Zealand road cone manufacturer, Proline Plastics, has closed the loop by taking back their old road cones to be shredded and recycled back into new cones. More than 15,000 road cones have been recycled by the company in the last 4 years at zero cost to their customers.

While road cones are a source of frustration to many New Zealand motorists, they are a necessary evil, as they play an important part in road safety. Every year, thousands of road cones come to the end of their useful life. They become damaged, or lose their reflectivity, and roading companies have to dispose of them. Auckland road cone manufacturer, Proline Plastics, has developed a process that enables them to recycle old cones into new ones.

Most road cones in New Zealand are made of PVC, a robust plastic that can be enhanced with additives to make it resistant to the harsh UV put out by New Zealand sun.

Proline Plastics is a leading manufacturer of road cones in New Zealand. They injection mould around 50,000 cones a year in their plant in Otahuhu, Auckland. The company has been making cones for the last 20 years.

PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) is a thermoplastic, and like all thermoplastics, it is fully recyclable. PVC also has particular properties that make it the best choice for road cones, and many other products. It is inherently flame retardant and resistant to chemicals and oils. It is also very durable because it resists oxidation. PVC also takes well to additives that modify colour, flexibility, impact resistance and UV resistance. These strengths and abilities to combine well with additives make PVC well suited to recycling.

Companies from all over New Zealand deliver old road cones to Proline in Auckland. The cones are shredded by a heavy duty shredder at J&J Laughton Shredding Services Ltd, before being finely granulated. Proline grinds the plastic even further so the recycled material is in pieces small enough to go through production machinery.

The finely granulated material is mixed with additives including colourant, UV inhibitor and plasticiser, before being fed back into Proline’s manufacturing process, replacing virgin PVC material.

On average, finished Proline road cones contain around 16% recycled material. Over the last 4 years Proline has recycled in excess of 15,000, or 100 tonnes, of road cones. This is material that has been diverted from NZ landfills.

Proline is a great example of a New Zealand manufacturer offering added value to customers by closing the loop and recycling its own products back into new ones. It is important that when companies make purchasing decisions on road cones they factor in the cost of disposing of these cones to landfill.

Proline help their customers to avoid landfill costs by recycling these old cones for free. This stewardship of their products is not something that distributors of imported cones currently offer. This is an example of a growing trend for manufacturers to help their customers deal with their products at the end of their life. It is a way of adding value for the customer, by helping them to improve their environmental performance and reduce the amount of waste being sent to landfill.

For more information visit www.plastics.org.nz
www.proline.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Trade Agreements: TPP Minus US Starting To Gain Ground

The Japanese government is picking up the pace on reviving the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade and investment deal, with talks scheduled next month among the 11 countries left in the pact after the withdrawal by the US after the election of president Donald Trump. More>>

ALSO:

PACER:

Prices Up 2.2%: Annual Inflation Highest In Over Five Years

"Rising petrol prices along with the annual rise in cigarette and tobacco tax lifted inflation," prices senior manager Jason Attewell said. "Petrol prices in New Zealand are closely linked to global oil prices, and cigarettes and tobacco taxes rise in the March quarter each year". More>>

ALSO:

Undertaxed? NZ Income Tax Rate Second Lowest Among Developed Nations

New Zealand workers pay the second smallest portion of their income to the government among developed nations and less than half the average ratio of their Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development peers. More>>

ALSO:

Cyclone Cook: Round Up Of This Week’s Weather

One of the significant impacts this week was flooding due to excessive rainfall amounts. Rainfall amounts topped out at 350mm over the past 60 hours in parts of northwest Nelson, with 200mm+ measurements recorded about Coromandel Peninsula, and between 150-200mm in the Kaimai Ranges. Rainfall amounts of between 30-50mm were commonplace elsewhere. More>>

ALSO:

Earlier: Batten Down The Hatches For Cyclone Cook

Although fast-moving, Cyclone Cook will be destructive and MetService Expert Meteorologists have issued Severe Wind Warnings for the whole of the North Island apart from Northland... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news