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New Zealanders are inviting crime into their homes

Research finds New Zealanders are inviting crime into their homes

26 per cent hide spare house keys outside for family members and tradespeople

20 per cent leave home or go to bed without locking up



Auckland, New Zealand, 7 August 2014:
New research from ADT Security has found that complacent New Zealanders are not following basic steps to prevent burglary.

As part of the inaugural Secure Homes Report, ADT Security surveyed 1047 homeowners and renters in both metropolitan and regional areas of New Zealand. The research found one in three respondents has been subject to a break-in, with 17 per cent of these intrusions happening while someone was at home. Furthermore, 11 per cent of those affected by burglary have experienced more than one break-in at their current residence.

Surprisingly, nearly 10 per cent of break-ins occurred by way of unforced window entry, where the window or door had been left ajar or unlocked highlighting the need for New Zealanders to be more vigilant about securing their home.

“Experiencing a break-in can be frightening and emotional for any homeowner or tenant and victims report feelings of insecurity, violation and anger. Those affected also have to bear the cost of replacing stolen items and fixing breakages,” said Ben Clements from ADT Security.

“The research results indicate that New Zealanders are making it easy for burglars to break into their homes. One in five leaves home without locking up, 18 per cent go to bed without securing windows and doors and 26 per cent of people hide their spare keys outside for tradespeople, cleaners or family members. This level of complacency is concerning.”

ADT Security encourages householders to carry out a security assessment of their property and consider a monitored alarm system to better protect themselves from burglary and other crimes.

“A good approach is to think like a thief. Walk around your property and identify where it is vulnerable. Once you identify your weak spots you can look at ways of reinforcing them. It’s important to remember that being at home doesn’t mean that you should leave your windows and doors open. Most break-ins occur when homeowners have presented burglars with an opportunity, like an unlocked window, whether they are home or not,” added Clements.
Home security tips:
• locks on doors and windows should always be the first line of defence
• don’t leave packaging of new appliances on the footpath in front of your house; this just advertises that you have new goods worth stealing. Instead tear up the box and put it in the recycling
• if your home has a shed or garage, ensure it is properly secured – not only could items be stolen, but items in the shed or garage can be used to help break into your property
• ensure spare keys aren’t hidden in obvious places. Thieves know to look in mailboxes, under doormats and above doorways for keys. Don’t make it easy for them to enter your home
• with apartments or multi-storey homes, be aware of locking doors and windows, as burglars can scale exterior walls
• a monitored home alarm is one of the most effective security measures. It’s possible to isolate certain zones of the home to be monitored, so that alarms can be activated even when the home is occupied. In the event that an ADT alarm is triggered, a signal is sent to a 24 hour Security Response Centre where trained operators identify the cause and take appropriate action.

For further information and advice on how to best protect your home and your family, read the home safety and security tips on the ADT Security websitewww.adtsecurity.co.nz

-Ends-

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